Particle physics

25 October 2016

Physics Colloquia Series Presents: LIGO Special by Professor Gabriela Gonzalez entitled 'Searching for - and finding! Gravitational Waves'

On September 14 2015, the two LIGO gravitational wave detectors in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana registered a nearly simultaneous signal with time-frequency properties consistent with gravitational-wave emission by the merger of two massive compact objects. Further analysis of the signals by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration revealed that the gravitational waves detected by LIGO came from the merger of a binary black hole system. This observation, followed by another one in December 2015, marked the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy.

22 September 2016

Colloquia Series Hilary Term 2017

The following lectures will be given at 3.30pm on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road (unless otherwise stated). Tea will be served in the Physics Common Room at 4.30 pm.

The aim of the colloquia series is to share with members of the department the latest information on physics research and developments. Undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty members and support staff are all encouraged to attend these lectures.

5 September 2016

LSST-DESC meeting July 18-22, 2016

One hundred and fifty members of the Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC) of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Collaboration held their annual summer meeting in Oxford in July, 2016 co-hosted by the Sub-departments of Astrophysics and Particle Physics. This was the first time LSST-DESC had held a meeting outside the U.S.

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6 June 2016

Supersymmetry squeezed at the high-energy frontier

First year Oxford graduate student Jesse Liu has just released a paper showing how the increase in LHC energy from 8 to 13 TeV has squeezed the permissible models of the theory of supersymmetry.

Supersymmetric theories predicts particles that could help explain the mysterious dark matter in our universe, and which can be produced at the LHC, so they are well worth pursuing.

Colloquia Series Trinity Term 2016: Lobanov- Rostovsky Lecture - Professor Raymond Pierrehumbert - “The origins and evolution of exoplanet astmospheres and oceans”

Date: 
27 May 2016 (All day)
Venue: 
clarendon
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre

Atmospheres are dynamic entities, formed from the volatile substances that accrete when a planet is formed and later in its history, cooked out in the hot-high pressure interior of the planet, and exchanging with the interior through crustal processes (for planets which have a solid surface) or mixing into the deep interior (for fluid planets). Loss of atmosphere to space is also a major mechanism whereby the chemical composition of entire planets evolve.

For more information contact: 

Colloquia Series Trinity Term 2016: Professor Bruce Remington - “Frontier Science on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)”

Date: 
29 Apr 2016 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
clarendon
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre

The combination of high energy density (HED) facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds, enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples at Mbar pressures and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors, as well as solid-state lattice dynamics and plastic flows, to be studied.

For more information contact: 

Final Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture

Date: 
3 Mar 2016 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

The Final Dennis Sciama Lecture will be delivered by Professor David Deutsch FRS on Thursday 3rd March 2016 @ 17:30 in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre.

For more information contact: 

Leanne O'Donnell
Leanne.odonnell@physics.ox.ac.uk
01865 613973

14 December 2015

Oxford Celebrates role in 2015 Nobel prize for Physics

On 14 December 2015, four days after the Nobel Prize was presented to Art MacDonald and Takaaki Kajita in Stockholm, the Particle Physics sub-department hosted a 'Nobel Banquet' to celebrate with Art the award of the 2015 Nobel Prize and 2016 Breakthrough Prize. Members of the department, alumni, friends, and former members of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) collaboration, many of whom had not seen each other in years, joined the celebration.

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9 November 2015

Oxford Physicists Share in Breakthrough Prize

Crucial work by Oxford University physicists on the neutrino has been recognised with a share of the
Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for their roles in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and T2K experiments.

More information here

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