AOPP

10 October 2019

This year's Nobel Prize

As James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz are announced as the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in physics, we look at the significance of their work.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to James Peebles for his theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology and to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz for their discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star.

Physics: Lab to Life

Date: 
22 Oct 2019 - 6:30pm to 9:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

Physics is changing your life.Nadlinger-Single-Atom-in-Ion-Trap_uncropped_0.jpg

At the Department of Physics, our research spans everything from the tiniest particles to the entire cosmos, but we don’t just leave the ideas scrawled on blackboards, hidden on hard drives or tucked into unfathomable scientific papers. We take our research and make it work for you.

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28 June 2019

Oxford Physics leads network to constrain the role of aerosols and clouds for global warming with AI

The European Commission has announced the funding of a new Innovative Training Network, led by Oxford University, which will train PhD students in Machine Learning Skills to address Climate Change.

iMIRACLI (innovative MachIne leaRning to constrain Aerosol-cloud CLimate Impacts) brings together leading climate and machine learning scientists across Europe with non-academic partners, such as Amazon and the MetOffice, to educate a new generation of climate data scientists.

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SETI Institute - An introduction to the research & education programs of SETI

Date: 
4 Jun 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
clarendon
Room: 
Lindemann Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
Specialised / research interest

Celebrating its 35th year in 2019, the SETI Institute, founded by Astronomers Carl Sagan, Jill Tarter and Frank Drake, has grown from a small research team focused on searching for radio signals beyond our solar system (as a proxy for intelligent civilizations) to an organization of over 90 PhD scientists representing 23 different academic backgrounds, organized into 6 divisions of research. CEO, Bill Diamond, will describe the multidisciplinary structure and research of the Institute, whose mission is to explore, understand and explain the nature and origins of life in the universe.

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Finance & Physicists Lecture

Date: 
9 May 2019 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
clarendon
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre

Finance might appear to be a world away from physics and hence from your life. However, whether you take not of it or not, your daily life is governed by markets. Finance is ultimately the study of markets, specifically seen through a financial lens and the understanding of these has ramifications for everything from how much we are paid to where we live and what is available in the supermarket.

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12 April 2019

British Instruments Reveal Secrets of Martian Sky

The first results from the ExoMars mission supported by the UK Space Agency reveal the effects of a massive, global dust storm on the Red Planet.
British instruments reveal secrets of martian sky

Over the last year the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) spacecraft followed the onset of the storm and monitored how the increase in dust affected the water vapour in the atmosphere - important for understanding the history of water on Mars.

29 March 2019

Winds of change...Solar variability influences the Walker circulation

An international team of researchers from United Kingdom, Denmark, and Germany has found robust evidence for signatures of the 11-year sunspot cycle in the tropical Pacific. They analyzed historical time series of pressure, surface winds, and precipitation with specific focus on the Walker Circulation - a vast system of atmospheric flow in the tropical Pacific region that affects patterns of tropical rainfall. They have revealed that during periods of increased solar irradiance, the trade winds weaken and the Walker circulation shifts eastwards.

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20 March 2019

Japanese weather satellite gives a unique perspective on a huge meteor

Sometimes satellites can provide an unexpected view of events. On the 18th December 2018 a huge meteor entered the Earth’s atmosphere over the northern Pacific Ocean, an event that – due to its isolated location – attracted very little attention at the time. American military satellites that look for bright flashes detected the meteor as it entered the Earth’s atmosphere and this enabled scientists at NASA to calculate its trajectory[1].

1 February 2019

Waters west of Europe drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate

A new international study finds that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, a deep ocean process that plays a key role in regulating Earth’s climate, is primarily driven by cooling waters west of Europe. In a departure from the prevailing scientific view, the study shows that most of the overturning and variability is occurring not in the Labrador Sea off Canada, as past modelling studies have suggested, but in regions between Greenland and Scotland.

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10 January 2019

A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future

Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017.

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