Astrophysics

The 13th Hintze Lecture: Our Simple but Strange Universe, Professor David Spergel

Date: 
10 Nov 2016 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

The 13th Hintze Lecture will be delivered by Professor David Spergel, Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy, Princeton Unversity, on Thursday 10th November 2016 @ 17:30 in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre.

Title: Our Simple but Strange Universe

For more information contact: 

Leanne O'Donnell
01865 613 973
Leanne.odonnell@physics.ox.ac.uk

6 August 2020

Professor Davies elected to Academia Europaea

Professor Roger Davies has been elected to the Academia Europaea in recognition of his groundbreaking studies of early-type galaxies.

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19 June 2020

RAS recognition for astro thesis

Dr Oliver Tattersall, a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant at the Department of Physics and former graduate student in the department has been named runner-up for the Royal Astronomical Society’s Michael Penston Thesis Prize.

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10 June 2020

Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship awarded to Rebecca Smethurst

Astrophysicist Dr Rebecca Smethurst from the University of Oxford’s Department of Physics has been awarded the Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship by the William Herschel Society with the Royal Astronomical Society. Becky is a Junior Research Fellow at Christ Church.

‘I am absolutely thrilled to have been chosen to give the Caroline Herschel Prize Lecture,' she comments. 'Herschel was a giant of astronomy, and a trailblazer for women in science. It’s a privilege to have been chosen for an award in her honour.’

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8 June 2020

International team discover 157-day cycle in unusual Fast Radio Bursts from a distant galaxy

A four-year observing campaign with the UK’s Lovell Telescope of an extraordinary source of Fast Radio Bursts – short duration bursts of radio emission thought to originate in a distant galaxy – has revealed an as yet undiscovered feature of this source. These latest findings have been published in a paper out today, 8 June 2020.

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3 June 2020

Welcome to the family!

The Department of Physics is delighted to welcome eight new Associate Professor Tutorial Fellows to its academic staff.

‘We are thrilled to be joined by such fantastic new colleagues,’ enthuses Professor Ian Shipsey, Head of Department. ‘Each one brings with them their rich experience, cutting-edge research and insightful teaching practice. As leading experts in their fields, the entire department is very excited for what the future holds. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the search committees for their excellent work in identifying such exceptional talent.’

27 March 2020

COVID-19: physics in the real world

Scientists around the world are racing to understand more about the COVID-19-causing virus – and physicists at Oxford are no exception. 'Without physics and physicists there could be no modern technological society, from microelectronics and telecommunications, to LCD displays and PET scanners in hospitals; it is therefore not surprising that physics has much to offer in the battle against CoV2,' explains Head of Department, Professor Ian Shipsey.

Postponed - Oxford Physics Y12 Summer School 2020

Date: 
27 Jul 2020 - 9:00am to 31 Jul 2020 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Audience: 
Schools (secondary)

The Oxford Physics Y12 Summer School is planned to run from 27th - 31st July 2020. Anyone in Year 12 or equivalent is welcome to apply. We will be constantly considering the summer school in light of arrangements for the coronavirus pandemic, but are currently planning as though it will go ahead.

For more information contact: 

Dr Kathryn Boast
Access Officer
kathryn.boast@physics.ox.ac.uk

3 March 2020

Meet...Nora Eisner

Name: Nora Eisner
Job title: Graduate student

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3 March 2020

Shedding new light on black hole ejections

A research group led by Oxford’s Department of Physics has observed a black hole ejecting material at close to the speed of light, out to some of the largest separations ever seen. These observations have allowed a deeper understanding into how black holes feed into their environment.

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