Astrophysics

The 13th Hintze Lecture: Our Simple but Strange Universe, Professor David Spergel

Date: 
10 Nov 2016 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

The 13th Hintze Lecture will be delivered by Professor David Spergel, Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy, Princeton Unversity, on Thursday 10th November 2016 @ 17:30 in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre.

Title: Our Simple but Strange Universe

For more information contact: 

Leanne O'Donnell
01865 613 973
Leanne.odonnell@physics.ox.ac.uk

14 November 2017

New invention available to industry – A novel signal cross coupling method

Signal couplers allow signals from two transmission lines to be combined and/or split, and can be used in a variety of applications including power distribution networks, sensor arrays, and astronomical instrumentation. Conventional couplers have both transmission lines, which carry the signal, running in parallel to each other, which makes them unsuitable for circuits that require signal path crossing or bypassing, particularly in applications in a linear array. Traditionally this is overcome by using cross-guide coupler, additional cabling or series of optical free-space beam splitters.

Ripples from the Dark Side of the Universe

Date: 
1 Nov 2017 - 6:45pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

Booking: Required in advance

medium_ripples.jpg

Gravitational waves - a prediction of Einstein’s General Relativity – are still among the most elusive signals from far out in the Universe.

For more information contact: 

Inaugural Oxford Network for Planets in the Universe Distinguished Lecture

Date: 
8 Nov 2017 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
clarendon
Room: 
Lindemann Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

Title: Getting to know alien worlds: Characterizing exoplanets from the ground and from space

Registration is required (no registration fee) Link to registration page

Time: 5 pm (to be seated by 4.50pm) on 8th November 2017

For more information contact: 

15th Hintze Lecture 'State of the Universe'

Date: 
13 Nov 2017 - 5:30pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

The 15th Hintze Lecture will be delivered by Professor Brian Schmidt, Vice-Chancellor of the Australian National University and 2011 Noble Prize Winner in Physics.

Title: State of the Universe
Abstract: Our Universe was created in 'The Big Bang' and has been expanding ever since. Professor Schmidt will describe the vital statistics of the Universe, including its size, weight, shape, age, and composition. Professor Schmidt will also try to make sense of the Universe's past, present, and future – and describe what we know, and what we do not yet know, about the Cosmos

For more information contact: 

Leanne O'Donnell
Tel: 01865 613 973
email : Leanne.odonnell@physics.ox.ac.uk

Dangerous Worlds

Date: 
13 Sep 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
martinwood
Room: 
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

Refreshments: Served from 6:30pm

fullwidth_DangerousWorlds.jpg

For more information contact: 

4 July 2017

Four Royal Society University Research Fellowships for Physics

The Royal Society has announced the appointment of 43 new University Research Fellows (URFs) for 2017. The University Research Fellowship scheme aims to provide outstanding early career scientists, who have the potential to become leaders in their chosen fields, with the opportunity to build an independent research career. The scheme is extremely competitive and URFs are expected to be strong candidates for permanent posts in universities at the end of their fellowships, and many have gone on to enjoy significant national or international recognition for their work.

22 June 2017

Steven Balbus awarded MPLS teaching award

Congratulations to Prof Steven Balbus who has been awarded an MPLS Teaching Award.

Prof Balbus commenced lecturing on the year 3 core course on General Relativity in HT 16. He received this award for his "exceptional ability to integrate research and teaching — both presenting complex current developments to undergraduates in an engaging and accessible form, and deriving new research insights through the teaching process."

Pages