Public Outreach

Cherwell-Simon Lecture 2012

Date: 
18 May 2012 - 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

QUANTUM GAMES AND QUANTUM INFORMATION

Professor Anton Zeilinger

University of Vienna and Scientific Director of the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

A quantum magician can play tricks that defy our classical imagination. For example, futuristic quantum dice rolled at an arbitrary distance can show the same number, or quantum balls hidden under a cup can exhibit colors impossible in any classical scenario.

26 November 2014

Now you can look for Higgs boson siblings by eye!

Oxford physicists are asking online volunteers to spot tiny explosions that could be evidence for as-yet-unobserved relatives of the Higgs boson.

The Higgs Hunters project launched today enables members of the public to view 25,000 images recorded at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. By tagging the origins of tracks on these images, volunteers could spot tiny sub-atomic explosions caused when a Higgs boson ‘dies’, which would be evidence for a kind of particle new to physics.

Stargazing Oxford

Date: 
26 Nov 2014 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Venue: 
Denys Wilkinson Building, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH
Audience: 
Family friendly

The Oxford University Physics Department is set to host another one of its eagerly-anticipated Stargazing Nights! This fun-filled evening of space activities will bring you closer to the stars and galaxies, and let you see some of the ways astronomers are able to learn about how the Universe works.

Oxford Physics Public Talk: Exploring Solar Systems - Ryan MacDonald

Date: 
17 Nov 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
Family friendly

Abstract: Our understanding of the solar system has changed considerably since the dawn of the space age. It was only 50 years ago that many scientists believed in algal blooms on Mars and rainforests on Venus (we were pretty sure the Moon wasn't made of Cheese though). Now we stand at the dawn of a new era, where we are receiving the first tantalising glimpses of the conditions on planets around other stars. Join us for a tour of the solar system, from the sun-scorched surface of Mercury, to the icy bodies of the Kuiper belt and beyond.

The 9th Hintze Lecture - Professor Scott Ransom - Millisecond Pulsars, Magnetars, and Black Holes: The Wickedly Cool Stellar Undead

Date: 
20 Nov 2014 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU

Professor Scott Ransom US National Radio Astronomy Observatory will give the 9th Hintze Lecture.

"Millisecond Pulsars, Magnetars, and Black Holes: The Wickedly Cool Stellar Undead"

Abstract: The most massive stars burn the fastest and brightest and die spectacularly, exploding as supernovae and leaving behind some of the most fantastic objects in the Universe: neutron stars and black holes.

2 October 2014

Jena Meinecke: American Physical Society October Woman Physicist of the Month

Each month, the American Physical Society's Committee for the Status of Women in Physics recognizes a female physicist who is making an impact in the physics community. Jena Meinecke, a graduate student in Atomic and Laser Physics, is October's Woman Physicist. Full story at http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/womanmonth/2014.cfm

23 September 2014

ATLAS Supersymmetry workshop in Oxford

The Higgs boson is just the start. With the collision energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) about to increase from 8 to 13 TeV, the search for other, as-yet-unobserved particles will soon be on.

This week, 140 physicists from around the world are meeting in St Catherine's College, Oxford, to plan their new-particle search strategies with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

Our Violent Solar System: Planetary Impacts and Meteors

Date: 
6 Oct 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

Our Violent Solar System: Planetary Impacts and Meteors

Dr. Leigh Fletcher

Cataclysmic impacts in the distant past shaped the surfaces of the Earth, Moon, terrestrial planets and satellites. These enormous collisions are rare, but threaten the very existence of life on Earth. Smaller-scale impacts are frequently seen on the lunar surface, on Jupiter, and as meteors on Earth. Comets regularly visit the inner solar system, dazzling us with their brilliant tails.

Massive Black Holes and Galaxies

Date: 
24 Jul 2014 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

Prof. Reinhard Genzel
MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching
University of California, Berkeley

Evidence has been accumulating for several decades that many galaxies harbor
central mass concentrations that may be in the form of black holes with masses
between a few million to a few billion time the mass of the Sun. I will discuss
measurements over the last two decades, employing adaptive optics imaging and
spectroscopy on large ground-based telescopes that prove the existence of such
a massive black hole in the Center of our Milky Way, beyond any reasonable
doubt.

26 June 2014

Black hole trio holds promise for gravity wave hunt

The discovery of three closely orbiting supermassive black holes in a galaxy more than four billion light years away could help astronomers in the search for gravitational waves: the ‘ripples in spacetime’ predicted by Einstein.

An international team, including Oxford University scientists, led by Dr Roger Deane from the University of Cape Town, examined six systems thought to contain two supermassive black holes.