Public Outreach

Cherwell-Simon Lecture 2012

Date: 
18 May 2012 - 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

QUANTUM GAMES AND QUANTUM INFORMATION

Professor Anton Zeilinger

University of Vienna and Scientific Director of the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

A quantum magician can play tricks that defy our classical imagination. For example, futuristic quantum dice rolled at an arbitrary distance can show the same number, or quantum balls hidden under a cup can exhibit colors impossible in any classical scenario.

Stargazing Oxford 2015

Date: 
21 Mar 2015 - 2:00pm - 10:00pm
Venue: 
Denys Wilkinson Building, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH
Audience: 
Family friendly

Stargazing Oxford returns on the 21st March 2015 from 2pm to 10pm (last entry 9.30pm). Entry is free and there is no need to book, just drop in!

BBC Stargazing LIVE is returning to BBC Two on the 18-20th March 2015 and Stargazing Oxford is also back!

The Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture

Date: 
29 Apr 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

The 11th Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Professor Philip Candelas, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford.

Title: Simple Calabi-Yau Manifolds and the Landscape of String Vacua

Abstract: It is widely known that there are a great many vacua of string theory. A small subset of these lead to four-dimensional worlds that are somewhat like the world that we observe. The great majority lead to worlds very different from our own. A vacuum is determined by a Calabi-Yau manifold together with certain extra structure.

The Wetton Lecture

Date: 
13 Apr 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

The Wetton Lecture will de delivered by Professor Carlo Frenk, Director, Institute for Computational Cosmology, University of Durham.

Title: "Everything from nothing, or how our universe was made"

Abstract: Cosmology confronts some of the most fundamental questions in the whole of science. How and when did our universe begin? What is it made of? How did galaxies and other structures form? There has been enormous progress in the past few decades towards answering these questions.

Public Talk: Darkness and dragons - the importance of eclipses by Charles Barclay

Date: 
2 Mar 2015 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General Public, 10 years +

This month's public talk will get us ready for the Total Solar Eclipse on 20th March 2015!

Abstract:
Ever since Man could record observations, in stone, in oral tradition and eventually in writing, the power of eclipses (both lunar and solar) cannot be underestimated. From the ominous blood red colour of the totally eclipsed Moon to the 'darkness in daylight' caused by a total solar eclipse. Even the apparent loss of portions of the disc can be alarming. The cycles of these events have been known for millennia and brought power to those able to predict them.

Public Talk: Moving Atoms for Science and Fun - Andreas Heinrich

Date: 
16 Jan 2015 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

Abstract:
The scanning tunnelling microscope has been an extremely successful experimental tool for nanoscience because of its ability to image surfaces of material with atomic-scale spatial resolution. In recent years this has been combined with the use of low temperatures, culminating in the ability to reposition individual atoms at will and build nanostructures one atom at a time.

In this talk we will focus on the development of atom manipulation and its application to scientific discovery over the last 20 years.

Stargazing Oxford 2015

Date: 
17 Jan 2015 - 2:00pm - 10:00pm
Venue: 
Denys Wilkinson Building, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH
Audience: 
Family friendly

Stargazing Oxford returns on the 17th January 2015 from 2pm to 10pm (last entry 9.30pm)

Last year over 1000 people of all ages gathered at Stargazing Oxford as they sought to explore the wonders of the Universe.

26 November 2014

Now you can look for Higgs boson siblings by eye!

Oxford physicists are asking online volunteers to spot tiny explosions that could be evidence for as-yet-unobserved relatives of the Higgs boson.

The Higgs Hunters project launched today enables members of the public to view 25,000 images recorded at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. By tagging the origins of tracks on these images, volunteers could spot tiny sub-atomic explosions caused when a Higgs boson ‘dies’, which would be evidence for a kind of particle new to physics.

Stargazing Oxford

Date: 
26 Nov 2014 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Venue: 
Denys Wilkinson Building, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH
Audience: 
Family friendly

The Oxford University Physics Department is set to host another one of its eagerly-anticipated Stargazing Nights! This fun-filled evening of space activities will bring you closer to the stars and galaxies, and let you see some of the ways astronomers are able to learn about how the Universe works.

Oxford Physics Public Talk: Exploring Solar Systems - Ryan MacDonald

Date: 
17 Nov 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
Family friendly

Abstract: Our understanding of the solar system has changed considerably since the dawn of the space age. It was only 50 years ago that many scientists believed in algal blooms on Mars and rainforests on Venus (we were pretty sure the Moon wasn't made of Cheese though). Now we stand at the dawn of a new era, where we are receiving the first tantalising glimpses of the conditions on planets around other stars. Join us for a tour of the solar system, from the sun-scorched surface of Mercury, to the icy bodies of the Kuiper belt and beyond.