Public Outreach

Cherwell-Simon Lecture 2012

Date: 
18 May 2012 - 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

QUANTUM GAMES AND QUANTUM INFORMATION

Professor Anton Zeilinger

University of Vienna and Scientific Director of the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

A quantum magician can play tricks that defy our classical imagination. For example, futuristic quantum dice rolled at an arbitrary distance can show the same number, or quantum balls hidden under a cup can exhibit colors impossible in any classical scenario.

Sir Martin Wood Prize Lecture

Date: 
8 Jun 2015 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Somerville College
Audience: 
Specialised / research interest

Title:
Effective field measurements and spin torque dynamics in magnetic nanostructures

The Sir Martin Wood Prize is awarded annually by the Millenium Science Forum to a young researcher from a Japanese University of Research Institute who has performed outstanding research in the area of condensed matter science. The prize is named after Sir Martin Wood, Founder of Oxford Instruments.

30 April 2015

Oxford graduate student is runner-up in UK FameLab final

Rob Shalloo, a first year graduate student studying laser plasma wakefield acceleration in the John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, was awarded one of 2 runners up prizes in the UK national final of FameLab on 22nd April. FameLab is an international science communication competition where contestants have to give a presentation on any area of science, using only the props they can carry on stage, in just 3 minutes.

The Hintze Lecture ‘The Quantum Universe’ by Prof Hitoshi Murayama

Date: 
5 May 2015 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

The 10th Hintze Lecture will be delivered by Professor Hitoshi Murayama, Director, Kavli Institute for the Physics & Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo.

Title: The Quantum Universe

Abstract:
Where do we come from? Science is making progress on this age-old question of humankind. The Universe was once much smaller than the size of an atom. Small things mattered in the small Universe, where quantum physics dominated the scene. To understand the way the Universe is today, we have to solve remaining major puzzles.

55th Cherwell-Simon Memorial Lecture 2015

Date: 
15 May 2015 - 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 14+)

Professor Charles Kane, Class of 1965 Endowed Term Chair & Professor of Physics, University of Pennsylvania will deliver the 55th Cherwell-Simon Lecture.

Title
Topological Boundary Modes from Quantum Electronics to Classical Mechanics

Abstract:
Over the past several years, our understanding of topological electronic phases of matter has advanced dramatically. A paradigm that has emerged is that insulating electronic states with an energy gap fall into distinct topological classes.

26 March 2015

Oxford graduate student's supersymmetry search is LHC physics highlight

The first ever search for the supersymmetric partner of the charm quark, led by Oxford graduate student Will Kalderon, has been selected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN as one of its physics highlights of the first run of the LHC.

In the first dedicated analysis of its kind, Will has completed an analysis of the ATLAS experiment's data searching for the proposed supersymmetric partner of the charm quark, the so-called “scalar-charm”. His analysis, which excluded low-mass scalar charm quarks, will be published in the next volume of Physical Review Letters.

Stargazing Oxford 2015

Date: 
21 Mar 2015 - 2:00pm - 10:00pm
Venue: 
Denys Wilkinson Building, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH
Audience: 
Family friendly

Stargazing Oxford returns on the 21st March 2015 from 2pm to 10pm (last entry 9.30pm). Entry is free and there is no need to book, just drop in!

BBC Stargazing LIVE is returning to BBC Two on the 18-20th March 2015 and Stargazing Oxford is also back!

The Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture

Date: 
29 Apr 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

The 11th Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Professor Philip Candelas, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford.

Title: Simple Calabi-Yau Manifolds and the Landscape of String Vacua

Abstract: It is widely known that there are a great many vacua of string theory. A small subset of these lead to four-dimensional worlds that are somewhat like the world that we observe. The great majority lead to worlds very different from our own. A vacuum is determined by a Calabi-Yau manifold together with certain extra structure.

The Wetton Lecture

Date: 
13 Apr 2015 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General public (Age 12+)

The Wetton Lecture will de delivered by Professor Carlo Frenk, Director, Institute for Computational Cosmology, University of Durham.

Title: "Everything from nothing, or how our universe was made"

Abstract: Cosmology confronts some of the most fundamental questions in the whole of science. How and when did our universe begin? What is it made of? How did galaxies and other structures form? There has been enormous progress in the past few decades towards answering these questions.

Public Talk: Darkness and dragons - the importance of eclipses by Charles Barclay

Date: 
2 Mar 2015 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
Audience: 
General Public, 10 years +

This month's public talk will get us ready for the Total Solar Eclipse on 20th March 2015!

Abstract:
Ever since Man could record observations, in stone, in oral tradition and eventually in writing, the power of eclipses (both lunar and solar) cannot be underestimated. From the ominous blood red colour of the totally eclipsed Moon to the 'darkness in daylight' caused by a total solar eclipse. Even the apparent loss of portions of the disc can be alarming. The cycles of these events have been known for millennia and brought power to those able to predict them.