Publications


Predicting El Niño in 2014 and 2015.

Scientific reports 8 (2018) 10733-

S Ineson, MA Balmaseda, MK Davey, D Decremer, NJ Dunstone, M Gordon, H-L Ren, AA Scaife, A Weisheimer

Early in 2014 several forecast systems were suggesting a strong 1997/98-like El Niño event for the following northern hemisphere winter 2014/15. However the eventual outcome was a modest warming. In contrast, winter 2015/16 saw one of the strongest El Niño events on record. Here we assess the ability of two operational seasonal prediction systems to forecast these events, using the forecast ensembles to try to understand the reasons underlying the very different development and outcomes for these two years. We test three hypotheses. First we find that the continuation of neutral ENSO conditions in 2014 is associated with the maintenance of the observed cold southeast Pacific sea surface temperature anomaly; secondly that, in our forecasts at least, warm west equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies do not appear to hinder El Niño development; and finally that stronger westerly wind burst activity in 2015 compared to 2014 is a key difference between the two years. Interestingly, in these years at least, this interannual variability in wind burst activity is predictable. ECMWF System 4 tends to produce more westerly wind bursts than Met Office GloSea5 and this likely contributes to the larger SST anomalies predicted in this model in both years.


Choosing the Optimal Numerical Precision for Data Assimilation in the Presence of Model Error

JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN MODELING EARTH SYSTEMS 10 (2018) 2177-2191

S Hatfield, P Dueben, M Chantry, K Kondo, T Miyoshi, T Palmer


The benefits of global high-resolution for climate simulation: process-understanding and the enabling of stakeholder decisions at the regional scale.

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2018)

MJ Roberts, PL Vidale, C Senior, HT Hewitt, C Bates, S Berthou, P Chang, HM Christensen, S Danilov, M-E Demory, SM Griffies, R Haarsma, T Jung, G Martin, S Minobe, T Ringler, M Satoh, R Schiemann, E Scoccimarro, G Stephens, MF Wehner


The Signature of Oceanic Processes in Decadal Extratropical SST Anomalies

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 7719-7730

CH O'Reilly, L Zanna


Reliable low precision simulations in land surface models

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 51 (2017) 2657-2666

A Dawson, PD Dueben, DA MacLeod, TN Palmer


An Intercomparison of Skill and Overconfidence/Underconfidence of the Wintertime North Atlantic Oscillation in Multimodel Seasonal Forecasts

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 7808-7817

LH Baker, LC Shaffrey, RT Sutton, A Weisheimer, AA Scaife


A power law for reduced precision at small spatial scales: Experiments with an SQG model

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 144 (2018) 1179-1188

T Thornes, P Duben, T Palmer


Improving Weather Forecast Skill through Reduced-Precision Data Assimilation

MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 146 (2018) 49-62

S Hatfield, A Subramanian, T Palmer, P Duben


Can bias correction and statistical downscaling methods improve the skill of seasonal precipitation forecasts?

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 50 (2018) 1161-1176

R Manzanas, A Lucero, A Weisheimer, JM Gutierrez


The impact of stochastic parametrisations on the representation of the Asian summer monsoon

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 50 (2018) 2269-2282

K Strommen, HM Christensen, J Berner, TN Palmer


Seasonal to annual ocean forecasting skill and the role of model and observational uncertainty.

Quarterly journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. Royal Meteorological Society (Great Britain) 144 (2018) 1947-1964

S Juricke, D MacLeod, A Weisheimer, L Zanna, TN Palmer

Accurate forecasts of the ocean state and the estimation of forecast uncertainties are crucial when it comes to providing skilful seasonal predictions. In this study we analyse the predictive skill and reliability of the ocean component in a seasonal forecasting system. Furthermore, we assess the effects of accounting for model and observational uncertainties. Ensemble forcasts are carried out with an updated version of the ECMWF seasonal forecasting model System 4, with a forecast length of ten months, initialized every May between 1981 and 2010. We find that, for essential quantities such as sea surface temperature and upper ocean 300 m heat content, the ocean forecasts are generally underdispersive and skilful beyond the first month mainly in the Tropics and parts of the North Atlantic. The reference reanalysis used for the forecast evaluation considerably affects diagnostics of forecast skill and reliability, throughout the entire ten-month forecasts but mostly during the first three months. Accounting for parametrization uncertainty by implementing stochastic parametrization perturbations has a positive impact on both reliability (from month 3 onwards) as well as forecast skill (from month 8 onwards). Skill improvements extend also to atmospheric variables such as 2 m temperature, mostly in the extratropical Pacific but also over the midlatitudes of the Americas. Hence, while model uncertainty impacts the skill of seasonal forecasts, observational uncertainty impacts our assessment of that skill. Future ocean model development should therefore aim not only to reduce model errors but to simultaneously assess and estimate uncertainties.


The Impact of Tropical Precipitation on Summertime Euro-Atlantic Circulation via a Circumglobal Wave Train

JOURNAL OF CLIMATE 31 (2018) 6481-6504

CH O'Reilly, T Woollings, L Zanna, A Weisheimer


Transforming climate model output to forecasts of wind power production: how much resolution is enough?

METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS 25 (2018) 1-10

D MacLeod, V Torralba, M Davis, F Doblas-Reyes


OPTIMAL-TRANSPORT-BASED MESH ADAPTIVITY ON THE PLANE AND SPHERE USING FINITE ELEMENTS

SIAM JOURNAL ON SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING 40 (2018) A1121-A1148

ATT Mcrae, CJ Cotter, CJ Budd


Forcing Single-Column Models Using High-Resolution Model Simulations.

Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems 10 (2018) 1833-1857

HM Christensen, A Dawson, CE Holloway

To use single-column models (SCMs) as a research tool for parameterization development and process studies, the SCM must be supplied with realistic initial profiles, forcing fields, and boundary conditions. We propose a new technique for deriving these required profiles, motivated by the increase in number and scale of high-resolution convection-permitting simulations. We suggest that these high-resolution simulations be coarse grained to the required resolution of an SCM, and thereby be used as a proxy for the true atmosphere. This paper describes the implementation of such a technique. We test the proposed methodology using high-resolution data from the UK Met Office's Unified Model, with a resolution of 4 km, covering a large tropical domain. These data are coarse grained and used to drive the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) SCM. The proposed method is evaluated by deriving IFS SCM forcing profiles from a consistent T639 IFS simulation. The SCM simulations track the global model, indicating a consistency between the estimated forcing fields and the true dynamical forcing in the global model. We demonstrate the benefits of selecting SCM forcing profiles from across a large domain, namely, robust statistics, and the ability to test the SCM over a range of boundary conditions. We also compare driving the SCM with the coarse-grained data set to driving it using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast operational analysis. We conclude by highlighting the importance of understanding biases in the high-resolution data set and suggest that our approach be used in combination with observationally derived forcing data sets.


A Simple Pedagogical Model linking Initial-Value Reliability with Trustworthiness in the Forced Climate Response.

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2017)

TN Palmer, A Weisheimer


Skilful Seasonal Predictions of Summer European Rainfall

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 3246-3254

N Dunstone, D Smith, A Scaife, L Hermanson, D Fereday, C O'Reilly, A Stirling, R Eade, M Gordon, C Maclachlan, T Woollings, K Sheen, S Belcher


Changes in European wind energy generation potential within a 1.5 degrees C warmer world

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS 13 (2018) ARTN 054032

JS Hosking, D MacLeod, T Phillips, CR Holmes, P Watson, EF Shuckburgh, D Mitchell


Flow dependent ensemble spread in seasonal forecasts of the boreal winter extratropics

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS 19 (2018) UNSP e815

D MacLeod, C O'Reilly, T Palmer, A Weisheimer


Challenges and opportunities for improved understanding of regional climate dynamics

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE 8 (2018) 101-108

M Collins, S Minobe, M Barreiro, S Bordoni, Y Kaspi, A Kuwano-Yoshida, N Keenlyside, E Manzini, CH O'Reilly, R Sutton, S-P Xie, O Zolina

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