Events

Date:
26 Oct 2020 - 3:30pm
Venue:
Online
Audience:
Staff, students and public (14+)

Dr Jess Wade discusses her research and the challenges that physics and physicists face, and shares some of her work to push for change.

In the first lecture of this new series from the Department of Physics, we will hear from Dr Jess Wade [she/her], a research fellow at Imperial College, London where she works on chiral organic light emitting diodes. She is an advocate for minority voices in science and has created hundreds of Wikipedia pages to amplify the achievements of women and people of colour in science.

Frank Close with thumbnail of book cover
Date:
3 Nov 2020 - 5:00pm
Venue:
Online
Audience:
General public (Age 14+)

Trinity: Klaus Fuchs, Oxford and the atomic bomb – a story of physics and espionage

Emeritus Professor Frank Close will explore the murky waters of cold war espionage, physics, the bomb and the role of Cotswold housewife 'Agent Sonya'. Trinity was the codename for the test explosion of the atomic bomb in New Mexico on 16 July 1945. Trinity is now also the extraordinary story of the bomb's metaphorical father, Rudolf Peierls; his intellectual son, the atomic spy, Klaus Fuchs, and the ghosts of the security services in Britain, the USA and USSR...

Logo with text saying Challenges and Changes with department of physics logo
Date:
11 Nov 2020 - 3:30pm
Venue:
Online
Audience:
Staff, students and public (14+)

Dr Clara Barker discusses her research and the challenges that physics and physicists face, and shares some of her work to push for change.

CHIME telescope with Victoria Kaspi headshot
Date:
24 Nov 2020 - 5:00pm
Venue:
Online
Audience:
General public (Age 14+)

World-renowned observational astrophysicist Vicky Kaspi will be talking about Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs): short bursts of radio waves, just a few milliseconds long, observed from cosmological distances. Their origin is presently unknown, yet their rate is many hundreds per sky per day, indicating a not-uncommon phenomenon in the Universe. Professor Kaspi will review the FRB field and present new results on FRBs from a new digital transit radio telescope: the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME).