A Higgs it is

Following the announcement of a discovery of a new boson on July 4th, 2012, focus turned to determining whether this new boson had the key properties of the predicted Higgs boson: production and decay rates to fermions and electroweak bosons determined by the particles' masses, and no intrinsic spin. The analysis of the full 2012 data set convincingly demonstrated that the new particle is consistent with these properties, and in March it was announced that a Higgs boson had indeed been discovered.

An important piece of evidence came from the ATLAS measurements of Higgs boson decays to W boson pairs, in which Oxford physicists were involved. The measurements demonstrated that the Higgs boson has the predicted couplings to W bosons, within the measured uncertainty of about 30%. In addition, a study of the angular distributions of the W-boson decay products demonstrated that the new particle is significantly more consistent with a spin-0 particle than a spin-2 particle. Oxford physicists determined key theoretical parameters and uncertainties for these measurements, which were announced at the Moriond conferences in March.

Consistency of data with the spin-0 hypothesis: The distribution of a discriminant for a spin-0 boson (in red) decaying to W-boson pairs (from ATLAS-CONF-2013-031).Consistency of data with the spin-2 hypothesis: The distribution of a discriminant for a spin-2 boson (in red) decaying to W-boson pairs (from ATLAS-CONF-2013-031).

See also "The Higgs Boson in your hand".