Enterprise news

27 March 2020

Scientists around the world are racing to understand more about the COVID-19-causing virus – and physicists at Oxford are no exception. 'Without physics and physicists there could be no modern technological society, from microelectronics and telecommunications, to LCD displays and PET scanners in hospitals; it is therefore not surprising that physics has much to offer in the battle against CoV2,' explains Head of Department, Professor Ian Shipsey.

20 February 2020

Researchers at Oxford have devised a broadband high efficiency frequency up-converter based on the nonlinear wave mixing mechanism in a travelling wave parametric device. The up-converter exhibits quantum-limit noise performance, high conversion efficiency and cleanly defined spectral components. Key application areas include quantum-computing, astronomical experimentation and cryogenic readout applications.

18 October 2019

Oxford Physics alumna Dr. Cecilia Muldoon and her team from VeriVin Ltd have been awarded a prestigious Institute of Physics Business Start-Up Award for VeriVin’s through-barrier analyser, that allows the authentication, characterisation and monitoring of complex liquids without opening their container.

The IOP Business Start-Up Award specifically recognises and celebrates young companies with a great business idea founded on a physics invention, with the potential for business growth and significant societal impact.

28 June 2019

The European Commission has announced the funding of a new Innovative Training Network, led by Oxford University, which will train PhD students in Machine Learning Skills to address Climate Change.

iMIRACLI (innovative MachIne leaRning to constrain Aerosol-cloud CLimate Impacts) brings together leading climate and machine learning scientists across Europe with non-academic partners, such as Amazon and the MetOffice, to educate a new generation of climate data scientists.

22 May 2019

The handling of non-spherical micron-sized objects is a challenge for the manufacturing industry and for the wider exploitation of nanomaterials. Current manipulation techniques consist of pick-and-place machines used to place microelectronic components onto circuit boards, and optical methods that use laser radiation to manipulate objects. Pick-and-place methods are unsuitable for objects smaller than 100 microns because electrostatic and Van der Waals attraction prevents their release.

16 May 2019

Congratulations to Professor Achillefs Kapanidis and Mr Bo Jing, CEO of Oxford Nanoimaging who have been named as BBSRC’s Innovator of the year 2019 – an award celebrating excellent research which demonstrates impact.

30 April 2019

The recent development of gene editing using biological system CRISPR, creates the prospect of dramatic developments in medicine for gene repair and cancer therapy. The CRISPR/Cas9 system allows targeted DNA cleavage and hence editing of the genome. However, unwanted DNA cuts, resulting from non-specific delivery to off-target cells, could promote tumorigenesis. Cell-specific activation of CRISPR/Cas9 is essential to avoid this problem.

30 April 2019

The technology available to licence is a new technique for using higher order Hermite-Gaus (HG) modes to increase the channel capacity in telecommunication networks via HG mode selective multiplexing. The bandwidth of telecommunication networks can consequently be brought up to the theoretical maximum for a particular time-frequency resource.
As the device proposed operates noise-free, the invention is expected to be of use in applications.

High capacity telecommunications using multiple modes

11 January 2019

Microgeneration is the generation of power on a small scale – for individual homes, communities or in emergency situations. Microgeneration is also important if you are on the move and isolated from the grid e.g. while boating or in a recreational vehicle. the move – for boats or recreational vehicles. The Oxford Microgeneration System converts mechanical energy from wind, water or any other means into electrical power.

11 December 2018

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of attention for their potential use in electronic and energy-related devices. In particular, conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) films are expected to be applied in anti-static materials, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials and other opto-electronic devices like solar cells. Poor solubility of CNTs in organic and aqueous solvents has, so far, been overcome with non-covalent wrapping with conjugated polymers, but at a high cost.

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