Publications associated with Terahertz Photonics


Unveiling the Influence of pH on the Crystallization of Hybrid Perovskites, Delivering Low Voltage Loss Photovoltaics

Joule 1 (2017) 328-343

NK Noel, M Congiu, AJ Ramadan, S Fearn, DP McMeekin, JB Patel, MB Johnston, B Wenger, HJ Snaith

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Impressive power conversion efficiencies coupled with the relative ease of fabrication have made perovskite solar cells a front runner for next-generation photovoltaics. Although perovskite films and optoelectronic devices have been widely studied, relatively little is known about the chemistry of the precursor solutions. Here, we present a study on the hydrolysis of N,N-dimethylformamide, correlating how pH changes related to its degradation affect the crystallization of MAPbI 3−x Cl x perovskite films. By careful manipulation of the pH, and the resulting colloid distribution in precursor solutions, we fabricate perovskite films with greatly improved crystallinity, which when incorporated into photovoltaic devices reproducibly yield efficiencies of over 18%. Extending this method to the mixed cation, mixed halide perovskite FA 0.83 MA 0.17 Pb(I 0.83 Br 0.17 ) 3 , we obtain power conversion efficiencies of up to 19.9% and open-circuit voltages of 1.21 V for a material with a bandgap of 1.57 eV, achieving the lowest yet reported loss in potential from bandgap to a V OC of only 360 mV. Metal halide perovskites have shown tremendous promise in optoelectronic devices and are of particular interest as absorber materials in solar cells, having achieved remarkable power conversion efficiencies in a staggeringly short period of time. Although improvements in deposition techniques have greatly increased the quality of perovskite films and have allowed perovskite solar cells to dominate the class of emerging photovoltaic technologies, relatively little focus has been placed on understanding the chemistry of the precursor solutions. Here, we elucidate how the hydrolysis and thermal decomposition of N,N-dimethylformamide, the most commonly used solvent for perovskites, has far-reaching effects on the crystallization and optoelectronic properties of perovskite films and show how controlling the degradation of this solvent allows us to achieve record low voltage losses in highly efficient perovskite solar cells. The degradation of N,N-dimethylformamide results in the formation of formic acid and dimethylamine. The changes in pH that occur as a result of this solvent degradation can be correlated to changes in the colloid concentration in perovskite precursor solutions. By tuning the pH and hence colloid concentration of these solutions, we improve the crystallization and optoelectronic quality of the perovskite films, resulting in solar cells with a record low loss in potential from bandgap to V OC of 360 mV.


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