News

21 February 2017

Friday, 24th February 2017 at 15:30

Abstract: For the English polymath, Robert Grosseteste, light was the fundamental first form that gave dimensionality and stability to the material world. In a dozen scientific treatises written in the early 13th Century, he postulated a physics of light, colour and the rainbow. In this talk, Prof. McLeish will introduce Robert Grossteste (ca 1170 -1253), the scientist, teacher, theologian and bishop and describe how a unique collaborative research approach has revealed new insights into his thought, particularly on light.

15 February 2017

Two researchers from the Department of Physics scooped prizes at the annual MPLS Impact Awards, which aim to foster and raise awareness of impact by rewarding it at a local level. The awards were presented by Prof Alison Noble at the MPLS Winter Reception to Prof Myles Allen and Prof Achillefs Kapanidis.

14 February 2017

Physics Colloquia Series – Astor Lecture

Plasma physics helps in establishing an upper bound for the photon mass
Dr. Dmitri D. Ryutov
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Tuesday, 7 March 2017 at 14.00

The finiteness of the photon mass does not contradict the relativity theory: it just puts the photon on par with other particles, with the limiting propagation velocity still in place. The photon mass, even if finite, is incredibly small, less than 10-24 of the electron mass [1], but even at this value it would have a strong effect on large-scale astrophysical phenomena.

14 February 2017

‘The applied side of Bell nonlocality’
Friday, 17 February 2017 at 15:30

Abstract: Since its formulation in 1964, Bell's theorem has been classified under "foundations of physics". Ekert's 1991 attempt to relate it to an applied task, quantum cryptography, was quenched by an approach that relied on a different basis and was allegedly equivalent. Ekert's intuition was finally vindicated with the discovery of "device-independent certification" of quantum devices.

1 February 2017

Professor Val Gibson, Cambridge, will present this Friday’s Physics Colloquium entitled ‘The Beauty of Flavour - Latest results from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider’ at the usual time of 3.30pm in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre (3 February 2017). Tea & Coffee will follow in the Clarendon Labs Common Room.

Abstract: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has just completed another very successful year of data-taking, exceeding many of its design parameters, and collecting a huge amount of data.

23 January 2017

The behaviour of the early universe just after the Big Bang is one of the most intriguing basic questions in all of science, and is extraordinarily difficult to answer because of insurmountable issues associated with replaying the Big Bang in the laboratory. One route towards the answer -- which lies at the intersection between cosmology and materials physics -- is to use laboratory materials to test the so-called "Kibble-Zurek" scaling laws proposed for the formation of defects such as cosmic strings in the early universe.

15 December 2016

Physics World's choice for the 2016 Book of the Year is Why String Theory? by Joseph Conlon.

Abstract, mathematically complex and (so far) unsupported by direct experimental evidence, string theory attracts plenty of criticism. Yet it remains an incredibly active area of research, with thousands of physicists and mathematicians around the world working on strings and related ideas. The reasons for its continued popularity are eloquently presented in Joseph Conlon's book Why String Theory?

1 December 2016

Our latest Department newsletter is now available to download in PDF format here (the file may not display correctly with Firefox/Chrome pdf viewers -- in this case save it to a file and open it with e.g. Acrobat reader or Preview).

Have a look at the wide range of work that we do in front-line research, teaching, public outreach and school education.

29 November 2016

This immersive 360 degree video lets you join in a planetary observing trip using some of the world's best telescopes in Hawaii.

To view on a regular screen, you can click and drag in the video frame to look in any direction. For an immersive experience, view the video using a virtual reality headset.

7 November 2016

It is with great sorrow that we mourn Edmund 'Ted' Wilson, who died on November 3rd 2016 after a short illness.

Ted was born on 18 March 1938 in Liverpool, the son of school teacher John Wesley Wilson and nurse Anna Wilson. He was a great accelerator physicist and an inspired and inspiring teacher. He was an engaging and entertaining companion, being one of those people who, while being quite serious about everything, never take themselves too seriously; he lived life to the full, doing as much good as he could along the way.