25 October 2016

The gamma-ray band of the electromagnetic spectrum probes some of the most extreme environments in the Universe. Photons of these very-high energies can only be produced by the interactions of subatomic particles that have been accelerated to almost the speed of light. This acceleration occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of astrophysical sources: close to black holes and neutron stars, in the blast waves of supernova explosions, and in the relativistic jets of active galaxies.

25 October 2016

From the earliest commercial production of electronic image sensors for television in the 1950s, to the diverse application of specialist silicon image sensors for the Hubble space Telescope to digital dentistry this talk will outline the manufacturing technology and changes through 60 years at e2v. Somewhat surprisingly, there are today lessons to be learned, and technologies to be applied from this to the emerging new platform technology of ultra-cold atom sensing and metrology.

25 October 2016

Janus particles are micro- or nano-scale particles whose surfaces have two or more distinct physical properties. Such asymmetry results in interesting self-assembly properties, but homogeneous Janus particles can be difficult to synthesize. The protein BslA (Bacterial Surface Layer A) is a small (~4 nm) protein produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that has a hydrophilic ‘body’ to which is appended a surface-exposed hydrophobic ‘cap’.

25 October 2016

Everything around us, everything each of us has ever experienced, and virtually everything underpinning our technological society and economy is governed by quantum mechanics. Yet this most fundamental physical theory of nature often feels as if it is a set of somewhat eerie and counterintuitive ideas of no direct relevance to our lives. Why is this?

One reason is that we cannot perceive the strangeness (and astonishing beauty) of the quantum mechanical phenomena all around us by using our own senses.

25 October 2016

On September 14 2015, the two LIGO gravitational wave detectors in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana registered a nearly simultaneous signal with time-frequency properties consistent with gravitational-wave emission by the merger of two massive compact objects. Further analysis of the signals by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration revealed that the gravitational waves detected by LIGO came from the merger of a binary black hole system. This observation, followed by another one in December 2015, marked the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy.

4 October 2016

Michael Kosterlitz, who carried out his DPhil at Brasenose College between 1966 and 1969, was today named a Nobel Laureate for his pioneering work to help reveal the secrets of exotic phases of matter that were hitherto unknown.
Professor Kosterlitz, now of Brown University in the US, shared half the prize with Professor Duncan Haldane of Princeton University, USA, with the other half going to Professor David Thouless of the University of Washington, USA.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awards the Nobel Prize in Physics, cited the three scientists' 'theoretical discoveries of

8 September 2016

Tim Palmer was awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree by the University of Bristol at the University Congregation on 21st July 2016. In his acceptance speech, Tim noted the important role that collaboration with scientists around Europe had played in his career. He warned of the damage that Brexit may cause in the future, in particular for UK scientists’ ability to play leadership roles in collaborative EU projects.

5 September 2016

One hundred and fifty members of the Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC) of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Collaboration held their annual summer meeting in Oxford in July, 2016 co-hosted by the Sub-departments of Astrophysics and Particle Physics. This was the first time LSST-DESC had held a meeting outside the U.S.

LSST-DESC meeting July 18-22, 2016LSST-DESC meeting July 18-22, 2016

Dark Energy - the unexplained acceleration of the universe - is one of the greatest mysteries in science today.

2 August 2016

A team from Oxford and UCL has shown that an iridium oxide compound satisfies a necessary requirement for a correlated Weyl semi-metal. The finding points the way towards a possible realization in the solid state of an exotic type of particle.

The Weyl semi-metal hosts a topologically non-trivial electronic state found as a solution of the Dirac equation for massless fermions. Such a state requires the combination of either (i) time-reversal symmetry with broken inversion symmetry, or (ii) inversion symmetry with broken time-reversal symmetry.

22 July 2016

The Department of Physics at the University of Oxford will be holding an Industry Day on Friday 23rd September 2016.

The event will see us open our doors with the objective of exploring how Oxford Physics can help your company innovate and grow. The event will allow companies to:

• Find out about our research and how to access our facilities
• Discuss our technologies and applications
• Meet our staff and students
• Network with other companies
• Explore collaboration opportunities

For further information, please contact phillip [dot] tait [at] physics [dot] ox [dot] ac [dot] uk