News

15 October 2014

Our latest Department newsletter is now available to download in PDF format here (the file may not display correctly with Firefox/Chrome pdf viewers -- in this case save it to a file and open it with e.g. Acrobat reader or Preview). Have a look at the wide range of work that we do in front-line research, teaching, public outreach and school education. We would welcome contributions to future newsletters from undergraduate or postgraduate alumni and previous members of the physics department.

2 October 2014

Each month, the American Physical Society's Committee for the Status of Women in Physics recognizes a female physicist who is making an impact in the physics community. Jena Meinecke, a graduate student in Atomic and Laser Physics, is October's Woman Physicist. Full story at http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/womanmonth/2014.cfm

23 September 2014

The Higgs boson is just the start. With the collision energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) about to increase from 8 to 13 TeV, the search for other, as-yet-unobserved particles will soon be on.

This week, 140 physicists from around the world are meeting in St Catherine's College, Oxford, to plan their new-particle search strategies with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

3 September 2014

IMPORTANT NOTICE

From September 2014, all new staff and graduate sudents are expected to use email accounts on the campus network email service (nexus). To access this service you need to use your University Single Sign On (SSO) rather than your physics specific account.

20 August 2014

The Holweck Medal for 2014 has been awarded to Professor Ramin Golestanian "for his pioneering contributions to the field of active soft matter, particularly microscopic swimmers and active colloids." The gold medal and a prize of Eu3000 is awarded by the Société Française de Physique, and was presented to Professor Golestanian at a ceremony in Paris on August 27.

21 July 2014

Spin and orbital quantum numbers play a key role in the physics of Mott insulators, but in most systems they are connected only indirectly - via the Pauli exclusion principle and the Coulomb interaction. Iridium-based oxides (iridates) introduce strong spin-orbit coupling directly, such that these numbers become entwined together and the Mott physics attains a strong orbital character.

9 July 2014

Yesterday a Soyuz-Fregat rocket lifted off at just before 5PM and along for the ride was a new, compact infrared instrument developed by the Planetary Experiments Group in Oxford Physics and RALSpace at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Called the Compact Modular Sounder, or CMS, the instrument is designed to map surface and atmospheric temperature properties, is about the size of a shoe box and has a mass of just 4.5 kg.

30 June 2014

This month, Oxford scientists are celebrating ten years of scientific exploration by the Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint NASA-ESA ‘flagship’ mission to explore the gas giant Saturn, its rings and diverse satellite system. Cassini has revealed many wonders in the outer solar system, from the hydrocarbon seas of Titan to the erupting plumes of Enceladus and the swirling storms of Saturn, and more is still to come as this sophisticated robotic spacecraft continues its lonely orbits a billion kilometres from home.

30 June 2014

Condensed Matter Physics is delighted to announce that Miss Danielle Kaminski, third year postgraduate student, has been awarded the Nicholas Kurti Prize 2014 for distinguished work by a third year graduate student in Condensed Matter Physics.
Well done, Danielle!

30 June 2014

Condensed Matter Physics is delighted to announce that Mr Michael Peterer, second year postgraduate student, has been awarded the David Ryan Prize 2014 for the best research presentation by a postgraduate student in their second year at the annual poster session.
Well done, Michael!