News

1 February 2017

Professor Val Gibson, Cambridge, will present this Friday’s Physics Colloquium entitled ‘The Beauty of Flavour - Latest results from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider’ at the usual time of 3.30pm in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre (3 February 2017). Tea & Coffee will follow in the Clarendon Labs Common Room.

23 January 2017

The behaviour of the early universe just after the Big Bang is one of the most intriguing basic questions in all of science, and is extraordinarily difficult to answer because of insurmountable issues associated with replaying the Big Bang in the laboratory. One route towards the answer -- which lies at the intersection between cosmology and materials physics -- is to use laboratory materials to test the so-called "Kibble-Zurek" scaling laws proposed for the formation of defects such as cosmic strings in the early universe.

15 December 2016

Physics World's choice for the 2016 Book of the Year is Why String Theory? by Joseph Conlon.

1 December 2016

Our latest Department newsletter is now available to download in PDF format here (the file may not display correctly with Firefox/Chrome pdf viewers -- in this case save it to a file and open it with e.g. Acrobat reader or Preview).

Have a look at the wide range of work that we do in front-line research, teaching, public outreach and school education.

29 November 2016

This immersive 360 degree video lets you join in a planetary observing trip using some of the world's best telescopes in Hawaii.

To view on a regular screen, you can click and drag in the video frame to look in any direction. For an immersive experience, view the video using a virtual reality headset. A guide to VR headsets can be found here.

7 November 2016

It is with great sorrow that we mourn Edmund 'Ted' Wilson, who died on November 3rd 2016 after a short illness.

Ted was born on 18 March 1938 in Liverpool, the son of school teacher John Wesley Wilson and nurse Anna Wilson. He was a great accelerator physicist and an inspired and inspiring teacher. He was an engaging and entertaining companion, being one of those people who, while being quite serious about everything, never take themselves too seriously; he lived life to the full, doing as much good as he could along the way.

28 October 2016

Condensed Matter Physics is delighted to announce that Joel Spratt has been awarded the Arthur Cooke Prize 2016 for distinguished work by a first year research student in Condensed Matter Physics.

25 October 2016

The early 1960s witnessed a wealth of elementary particles described in terms of simple combinations of a few more elementary units, dubbed quarks. The known mesons and baryons could all be described as states of quark-antiquark or three quarks. However, it was not understood why certain more elaborate combinations, such as (two quarks + two antiquarks) or (four quarks + one antiquark) had not been observed. It has taken nearly half a century, but these "exotic" particles are now beginning to be seen and understood.

25 October 2016

The gamma-ray band of the electromagnetic spectrum probes some of the most extreme environments in the Universe. Photons of these very-high energies can only be produced by the interactions of subatomic particles that have been accelerated to almost the speed of light. This acceleration occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of astrophysical sources: close to black holes and neutron stars, in the blast waves of supernova explosions, and in the relativistic jets of active galaxies.

25 October 2016

From the earliest commercial production of electronic image sensors for television in the 1950s, to the diverse application of specialist silicon image sensors for the Hubble space Telescope to digital dentistry this talk will outline the manufacturing technology and changes through 60 years at e2v. Somewhat surprisingly, there are today lessons to be learned, and technologies to be applied from this to the emerging new platform technology of ultra-cold atom sensing and metrology.

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