Publications


Energy budget-based backscatter in a shallow water model of a double gyre basin

Ocean Modelling 132 (2018) 1-11

M Klöwer, MF Jansen, M Claus, RJ Greatbatch, S Thomsen

© 2018 The parameterization of sub-grid scale processes is one of the key challenges towards improved numerical simulations of the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Numerical weather prediction models as well as climate models would benefit from more sophisticated turbulence closures that allow for less spurious dissipation at the grid-scale and consequently higher and more realistic levels of eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Recent studies propose to use a hyperviscous closure in combination with an additional deterministic forcing term as a negative viscosity to represent backscatter of energy from unresolved scales. The sub-grid EKE is introduced as an additional prognostic variable that is fed by dissipation at the grid scale, and enables recycling of EKE via the backscatter term at larger scales. This parameterization was previously shown to work well in zonally re-entrant channel configurations. Here, a generalization in the form of a Rossby number-dependent scaling for the strength of the backscatter is introduced to represent the emergence of a forward energy-cascade in unbalanced flows near the boundaries. We apply the parameterization to a shallow water model of a double gyre basin and provide evidence for its general applicability. In terms of mean state and variability, a low resolution model is considerably improved towards a high resolution control run at low additional computational cost.


Predicting El Niño in 2014 and 2015.

Scientific reports 8 (2018) 10733-

S Ineson, MA Balmaseda, MK Davey, D Decremer, NJ Dunstone, M Gordon, H-L Ren, AA Scaife, A Weisheimer

Early in 2014 several forecast systems were suggesting a strong 1997/98-like El Niño event for the following northern hemisphere winter 2014/15. However the eventual outcome was a modest warming. In contrast, winter 2015/16 saw one of the strongest El Niño events on record. Here we assess the ability of two operational seasonal prediction systems to forecast these events, using the forecast ensembles to try to understand the reasons underlying the very different development and outcomes for these two years. We test three hypotheses. First we find that the continuation of neutral ENSO conditions in 2014 is associated with the maintenance of the observed cold southeast Pacific sea surface temperature anomaly; secondly that, in our forecasts at least, warm west equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies do not appear to hinder El Niño development; and finally that stronger westerly wind burst activity in 2015 compared to 2014 is a key difference between the two years. Interestingly, in these years at least, this interannual variability in wind burst activity is predictable. ECMWF System 4 tends to produce more westerly wind bursts than Met Office GloSea5 and this likely contributes to the larger SST anomalies predicted in this model in both years.


The Signature of Oceanic Processes in Decadal Extratropical SST Anomalies

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 7719-7730

CH O'Reilly, L Zanna


Reliable low precision simulations in land surface models

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 51 (2018) 2657-2666

A Dawson, PD Dueben, DA MacLeod, TN Palmer


Recent multivariate changes in the North Atlantic climate system, with a focus on 2005–2016

International Journal of Climatology 38 (2018) 5050-5076

J Robson, RT Sutton, A Archibald, F Cooper, M Christensen, LJ Gray, NP Holliday, C Macintosh, M McMillan, B Moat, M Russo, R Tilling, K Carslaw, D Desbruyères, O Embury, DL Feltham, DP Grosvenor, S Josey, B King, A Lewis, GD McCarthy, C Merchant, AL New, CH O'Reilly, SM Osprey, K Read, A Scaife, A Shepherd, B Sinha, D Smeed, D Smith, A Ridout, T Woollings, M Yang

© 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Climatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Royal Meteorological Society. Major changes are occurring across the North Atlantic climate system, including in the atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere, and many observed changes are unprecedented in instrumental records. As the changes in the North Atlantic directly affect the climate and air quality of the surrounding continents, it is important to fully understand how and why the changes are taking place, not least to predict how the region will change in the future. To this end, this article characterizes the recent observed changes in the North Atlantic region, especially in the period 2005–2016, across many different aspects of the system including: atmospheric circulation; atmospheric composition; clouds and aerosols; ocean circulation and properties; and the cryosphere. Recent changes include: an increase in the speed of the North Atlantic jet stream in winter; a southward shift in the North Atlantic jet stream in summer, associated with a weakening summer North Atlantic Oscillation; increases in ozone and methane; increases in net absorbed radiation in the mid-latitude western Atlantic, linked to an increase in the abundance of high level clouds and a reduction in low level clouds; cooling of sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre, concomitant with increases in the western subtropical gyre, and a decline in the Atlantic Ocean's overturning circulation; a decline in Atlantic sector Arctic sea ice and rapid melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. There are many interactions between these changes, but these interactions are poorly understood. This article concludes by highlighting some of the key outstanding questions.


An Intercomparison of Skill and Overconfidence/Underconfidence of the Wintertime North Atlantic Oscillation in Multimodel Seasonal Forecasts

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 7808-7817

LH Baker, LC Shaffrey, RT Sutton, A Weisheimer, AA Scaife


Improving Weather Forecast Skill through Reduced-Precision Data Assimilation

MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 146 (2018) 49-62

S Hatfield, A Subramanian, T Palmer, P Duben


Seasonal predictability of onset and cessation of the east African rains

Weather and Climate Extremes 21 (2018) 27-35

D MacLeod

© 2018 The Author Advanced warning of delayed onset or early cessation of the rainy seasons would be extremely valuable information for farmers in east Africa and is a common request from regional stakeholders. Such warnings are beginning to be provided, however forecast skill for these metrics has not been demonstrated. Here the forecast skill of the ECMWF seasonal hindcasts is evaluated for onset and cessation forecasts over east Africa. Correlation of forecast with observed long rains anomalies only above a 95% statistical significance level for a small part of the domain, whilst short rains are significance a large part of the region. The added value of updating the forecast outlook with the extended range 46 day forecast is assessed and this gives a small improvement. For the short rains detection of early onset is better near the coast, and late onset detection is better over northwestern Kenya. During exceptionally dry years the method to detect onset and cessation fails. Using this as a definition of a failed season, the model shows significant skill at anticipating long rains season failure in the northwest of Kenya, and short rains failure in Somalia and northeast Kenya. In addition the strength of the correlation between long rains cessation and seasonal total is shown to be particularly weak in observations but too strong in the hindcasts. Predictability of onset and cessation for both seasons appears to arise primarily from the link with seasonal total and it is unclear that the model represents variability in onset and cessation beyond this. This has important implications for operational forecasting: any forecast of season timing which is ‘inconsistent’ with seasonal total (e.g. an early onset but low total rainfall) must be treated with caution. Finally links with zonal winds are investigated. Late onset is correlated with easterly (westerly) anomalies during the long (short) rains, though the strength and spatial pattern of the relationship is not well represented in the model. Early cessation is correlated with easterly anomalies in both seasons for most of the region in both observations and hindcasts. However for the long rains the sign of the correlation is reversed along the coast in observations but not in the hindcasts. These dynamical inconsistencies may have a negative impact on forecast skill and have the potential to inform process-based development of climate modelling in the region.


Seasonal to annual ocean forecasting skill and the role of model and observational uncertainty

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 144 (2018) 1947-1964

S Juricke, D MacLeod, A Weisheimer, L Zanna, TN Palmer


The Impact of Tropical Precipitation on Summertime Euro-Atlantic Circulation via a Circumglobal Wave Train

JOURNAL OF CLIMATE 31 (2018) 6481-6504

CH O'Reilly, T Woollings, L Zanna, A Weisheimer


Transforming climate model output to forecasts of wind power production: how much resolution is enough?

METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS 25 (2018) 1-10

D MacLeod, V Torralba, M Davis, F Doblas-Reyes


Ensemble sensitivity analysis of Greenland blocking in medium-range forecasts

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 144 (2018) 2358-2379

T Parker, T Woollings, A Weisheimer


Forcing Single-Column Models Using High-Resolution Model Simulations.

Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems 10 (2018) 1833-1857

HM Christensen, A Dawson, CE Holloway

To use single-column models (SCMs) as a research tool for parameterization development and process studies, the SCM must be supplied with realistic initial profiles, forcing fields, and boundary conditions. We propose a new technique for deriving these required profiles, motivated by the increase in number and scale of high-resolution convection-permitting simulations. We suggest that these high-resolution simulations be coarse grained to the required resolution of an SCM, and thereby be used as a proxy for the true atmosphere. This paper describes the implementation of such a technique. We test the proposed methodology using high-resolution data from the UK Met Office's Unified Model, with a resolution of 4 km, covering a large tropical domain. These data are coarse grained and used to drive the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) SCM. The proposed method is evaluated by deriving IFS SCM forcing profiles from a consistent T639 IFS simulation. The SCM simulations track the global model, indicating a consistency between the estimated forcing fields and the true dynamical forcing in the global model. We demonstrate the benefits of selecting SCM forcing profiles from across a large domain, namely, robust statistics, and the ability to test the SCM over a range of boundary conditions. We also compare driving the SCM with the coarse-grained data set to driving it using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast operational analysis. We conclude by highlighting the importance of understanding biases in the high-resolution data set and suggest that our approach be used in combination with observationally derived forcing data sets.


Impact of Gulf Stream SST biases on the global atmospheric circulation

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 51 (2018) 3369-3387

RW Lee, TJ Woollings, BJ Hoskins, KD Williams, CH O'Reilly, G Masato


The northern hemisphere circumglobal teleconnection in a seasonal forecast model and its relationship to European summer forecast skill

Climate Dynamics (2018)

JD Beverley, SJ Woolnough, LH Baker, SJ Johnson, A Weisheimer

© 2018, The Author(s). Forecasting seasonal variations in European summer weather represents a considerable challenge. Here, we assess the performance of a seasonal forecasting model at representing a major mode of northern hemisphere summer climate variability, the circumglobal teleconnection (CGT), and the implications of errors in its representation on seasonal forecasts for the European summer (June, July, August). Using seasonal hindcasts initialised at the start of May, we find that the model skill for forecasting the interannual variability of 500 hPa geopotential height is poor, particularly over Europe and several other “centres of action” of the CGT. The model also has a weaker CGT pattern than is observed, particularly in August, when the observed CGT wavetrain is strongest. We investigate several potential causes of this poor skill. First, model variance in geopotential height in west-central Asia (an important region for the maintenance of the CGT) is lower than observed in July and August, associated with a poor representation of the link between this region and Indian monsoon precipitation. Second, analysis of the Rossby wave source shows that the source associated with monsoon heating is both too strong and displaced to the northeast in the model. This is related to errors in monsoon precipitation over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, where the model has more precipitation than is observed. Third, the model jet is systematically shifted northwards by several degrees latitude over large parts of the northern hemisphere, which may affect the propagation characteristics of Rossby waves in the model.


Skilful Seasonal Predictions of Summer European Rainfall

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 45 (2018) 3246-3254

N Dunstone, D Smith, A Scaife, L Hermanson, D Fereday, C O'Reilly, A Stirling, R Eade, M Gordon, C Maclachlan, T Woollings, K Sheen, S Belcher


Changes in European wind energy generation potential within a 1.5 degrees C warmer world

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS 13 (2018) ARTN 054032

JS Hosking, D MacLeod, T Phillips, CR Holmes, P Watson, EF Shuckburgh, D Mitchell


Flow dependent ensemble spread in seasonal forecasts of the boreal winter extratropics

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS 19 (2018) UNSP e815

D MacLeod, C O'Reilly, T Palmer, A Weisheimer


Interdecadal variability of the ENSO teleconnection to the wintertime North Pacific

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 51 (2018) 3333-3350

CH O'Reilly


Challenges and opportunities for improved understanding of regional climate dynamics

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE 8 (2018) 101-108

M Collins, S Minobe, M Barreiro, S Bordoni, Y Kaspi, A Kuwano-Yoshida, N Keenlyside, E Manzini, CH O'Reilly, R Sutton, S-P Xie, O Zolina

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