Publications


The energetics of starburst-driven outflows at z similar to 1 from KMOS

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 487 (2019) 381-393

AM Swinbank, CM Harrison, AL Tiley, HL Johnson, I Smail, JP Stott, PN Best, RG Bower, M Bureau, A Bunker, M Cirasuolo, M Jarvis, GE Magdis, RM Sharples, D Sobral


Review: Far-infrared instrumentation and technological development for the next decade

Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems 5 (2019)

D Farrah, KE Smith, D Ardila, CM Bradford, M Dipirro, C Ferkinhoff, J Glenn, P Goldsmith, D Leisawitz, T Nikola, N Rangwala, SA Rinehart, J Staguhn, M Zemcov, J Zmuidzinas, J Bartlett, S Carey, WJ Fischer, J Kamenetzky, J Kartaltepe, M Lacy, DC Lis, L Locke, LR Enrique, M MacGregor, E Mills, SH Moseley, EJ Murphy, A Rhodes, M Richter, D Rigopoulou, D Sanders, R Sankrit, G Savini, S John-David, S Stierwalt

© Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. Far-infrared astronomy has advanced rapidly since its inception in the late 1950s, driven by a maturing technology base and an expanding community of researchers. This advancement has shown that observations at far-infrared wavelengths are important in nearly all areas of astrophysics, from the search for habitable planets and the origin of life to the earliest stages of galaxy assembly in the first few hundred million years of cosmic history. The combination of a still-developing portfolio of technologies, particularly in the field of detectors, and a widening ensemble of platforms within which these technologies can be deployed, means that farinfrared astronomy holds the potential for paradigm-shifting advances over the next decade. We examine the current and future far-infrared observing platforms, including ground-based, suborbital, and space-based facilities, and discuss the technology development pathways that will enable and enhance these platforms to best address the challenges facing far-infrared astronomy in the 21st century.


Nuclear molecular outflow in the Seyfert galaxy NGC3227

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 628 (2019) ARTN A65

A Alonso-Herrero, S Garcia-Burillo, M Pereira-Santaella, RI Davies, F Combes, M Vestergaard, SI Raimundo, A Bunker, T Diaz-Santos, P Gandhi, I Garcia-Bernete, EKS Hicks, SF Honig, LK Hunt, M Imanishi, T Izumi, NA Levenson, W Maciejewski, C Packham, C Ramos Almeida, C Ricci, D Rigopoulou, PF Roche, D Rosario, M Schartmann, A Usero, MJ Ward


Discovery of a giant and luminous Lyα+C IV+He II nebula at z = 3.326 with extreme emission line ratios

Astronomy & Astrophysics EDP Sciences 629 (2019) A23-A23

R Marques-Chaves, I Pérez-Fournon, M Villar-Martín, R Gavazzi, D Riechers, D Rigopoulou, J Wardlow, A Cabrera-Lavers, DL Clements, L Colina, A Cooray, D Farrah, RJ Ivison, C Jiménez-Ángel, P Martínez-Navajas, H Nayyeri, S Oliver, A Omont, D Scott, Y Shu

<jats:p>We present the discovery of HLock01-LAB, a luminous and large Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic> nebula at <jats:italic>z</jats:italic> = 3.326. Medium-band imaging and long-slit spectroscopic observations with the Gran Telescopio Canarias reveal extended emission in the Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic> 1215 Å, C <jats:sc>IV</jats:sc> 1550 Å, and He <jats:sc>II</jats:sc> 1640 Å lines over ∼100 kpc, and a total luminosity <jats:italic>L</jats:italic><jats:sub>Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic></jats:sub> = (6.4 ± 0.1)×10<jats:sup>44</jats:sup> erg s<jats:sup>−1</jats:sup>. HLock01-LAB presents an elongated morphology aligned with two faint radio sources contained within the central ∼8 kpc of the nebula. The radio structures are consistent with faint radio jets or lobes of a central galaxy, whose spectrum shows nebular emission characteristic of a type-II active galactic nucleus (AGN). The continuum emission of the AGN at short wavelengths is however likely dominated by stellar emission of the host galaxy, for which we derive a stellar mass <jats:italic>M</jats:italic><jats:sub>*</jats:sub> ≃ 2.3 × 10<jats:sup>11</jats:sup> <jats:italic>M</jats:italic><jats:sub>⊙</jats:sub>. Our kinematic analysis shows that the ionized gas is perturbed almost exclusively in the inner region between the radio structures, probably as a consequence of jet–gas interactions, whereas in the outer regions the ionized gas appears more quiescent. The detection of extended emission in C <jats:sc>IV</jats:sc> and C <jats:sc>III]</jats:sc> indicates that the gas within the nebula is not primordial. Feedback may have enriched the halo at at least 50 kpc from the nuclear region. Using rest-frame UV emission-line diagnostics, we find that the gas in the nebula is likely heated by the AGN. Nevertheless, at the center of the nebula we find extreme emission line ratios of Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic>/C <jats:sc>IV</jats:sc> ∼60 and Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic>/He <jats:sc>II</jats:sc> ∼80, one of the highest values measured to date, and well above the standard values of photoionization models (Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic>/He <jats:sc>II</jats:sc> ∼30 for case B photoionization). Our data suggest that jet-induced shocks are likely responsible for the increase of the electron temperature and, thus, the observed Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic> enhancement in the center of the nebula. This scenario is further supported by the presence of radio structures and perturbed kinematics in this region. The large Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic> luminosity in HLock01-LAB is likely due to a combination of AGN photoionization and jet-induced shocks, highlighting the diversity of sources of energy powering Ly<jats:italic>α</jats:italic> nebulae. Future follow-up observations of HLock01-LAB will help to reveal the finer details of the excitation conditions of the gas induced by jets and to investigate the underlying cooling and feedback processes in this unique object.</jats:p>


LoTSS DR1: Double-double radio galaxies in the HETDEX field

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A13

VH Mahatma, MJ Hardcastle, WL Williams, PN Best, JH Croston, K Duncan, B Mingo, R Morganti, M Brienza, RK Cochrane, G Gurkan, JJ Harwood, MJ Jarvis, M Jamrozy, N Jurlin, LK Morabito, HJA Rottgering, J Sabater, TW Shimwell, DJB Smith, A Shulevski, C Tasse


The origin of radio emission in broad absorption line quasars: Results from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A15

LK Morabito, JH Matthews, PN Best, G Gurkan, MJ Jarvis, I Prandoni, KJ Duncan, MJ Hardcastle, M Kunert-Bajraszewska, AP Mechev, S Mooney, J Sabater, HJA Rottgering, TW Shimwell, DJB Smith, C Tasse, WL Williams


JINGLE, a JCMT legacy survey of dust and gas for galaxy evolution studies: II. SCUBA-2 850 mu m data reduction and dust flux density catalogues

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 486 (2019) 4166-4185

MWL Smith, CJR Clark, I De Looze, I Lamperti, A Saintonge, CD Wilson, G Accurso, E Brinks, M Bureau, EJ Chung, PJ Cigan, DL Clements, T Dharmawardena, L Fanciullo, Y Gao, Y Gao, WK Gear, HL Gomez, J Greenslade, HS Hwang, F Kemper, JC Lee, C Li, L Lin, L Liu, DC Molnar, A Mok, H-A Pan, M Sargent, P Scicluna, CMA Smith, S Urquhart, TG Williams, T Xiao, C Yang, M Zhu


What do astronomers want from the STFC?

ASTRONOMY & GEOPHYSICS 60 (2019) 13-17

S Serjeant, J Bolton, P Gandhi, C Helling, P Mazzali, B Stappers, Y Unruh, A Verma


Radio-loud AGN in the first LoTSS data release The lifetimes and environmental impact of jet-driven sources

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A12

MJ Hardcastle, WL Williams, PN Best, JH Croston, KJ Duncan, HJA Rottgering, J Sabater, TW Shimwell, C Tasse, JR Callingham, RK Cochrane, F de Gasperin, G Gurkan, MJ Jarvis, V Mahatma, GK Miley, B Mingo, S Mooney, LK Morabito, SP O'Sullivan, I Prandoni, A Shulevski, DJB Smith


Optical integral field spectroscopy of intermediate redshift infrared bright galaxies

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 486 (2019) 5621-5645

M Pereira-Santaella, D Rigopoulou, GE Magdis, N Thatte, A Alonso-Herrero, F Clarke, D Farrah, S Garcia-Burillo, L Hogan, S Morris, M Rodrigues, J-S Huang, M Tecza


Dust properties in the cold and hot gas phases of the ATLAS(3D) early-type galaxies as revealed by AKARI

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A87

T Kokusho, H Kaneda, M Bureau, T Suzuki, K Murata, A Kondo, M Yamagishi, T Tsuchikawa, T Furuta


The AGN fuelling/feedback cycle in nearby radio galaxies I. ALMA observations and early results

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 484 (2019) 4239-4259

I Ruffa, I Prandoni, RA Laing, R Paladino, P Parma, H de Ruiter, A Mignano, TA Davis, M Bureau, J Warren


WISDOM project - IV. A molecular gas dynamical measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in NGC 524

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 485 (2019) 4359-4374

MD Smith, M Bureau, TA Davis, M Cappellari, L Liu, EV North, K Onishi, S Iguchi, M Sarzi


Torus model properties of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of Seyfert galaxies

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 486 (2019) 4917-4935

I Garcia-Bernete, CR Almeida, A Alonso-Herrero, MJ Ward, JA Acosta-Pulido, M Pereira-Santaella, A Hernan-Caballero, A Asensio Ramos, O Gonzalez-Martin, NA Levenson, S Mateos, FJ Carrera, C Ricci, P Roche, I Marquez, C Packham, J Masegosa, L Fuller


LoTSS DR1: Double-double radio galaxies in the HETDEX field

Astronomy and Astrophysics 622 (2019)

VH Mahatma, MJ Hardcastle, WL Williams, PN Best, JH Croston, K Duncan, B Mingo, R Morganti, M Brienza, RK Cochrane, G Gürkan, JJ Harwood, MJ Jarvis, M Jamrozy, N Jurlin, LK Morabito, HJA Röttgering, J Sabater, TW Shimwell, DJB Smith, A Shulevski, C Tasse

© ESO 2019. Context. Double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs) represent a short but unique phase in the life-cycle of some of the most powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGN). These galaxies display large-scale remnant radio plasma in the intergalactic medium left behind by a past episode of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity, and meanwhile, the radio jets have restarted in a new episode. The knowledge of what causes the jets to switch off and restart is crucial to our understanding of galaxy evolution, while it is important to know if DDRGs form a host galaxy dichotomy relative to RLAGN. Aims. The sensitivity and field of view of LOFAR enables the observation of DDRGs on a population basis rather than single-source observations. Using statistical comparisons with a control sample of RLAGN, we may obtain insights into the nature of DDRGs in the context of their host galaxies, where physical differences in their hosts compared to RLAGN as a population may allow us to infer the conditions that drive restarting jets. Methods. We utilised the LOFAR Two-Metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) DR1, using a visual identification method to compile a sample of morphologically selected candidate DDRGs, showing two pairs of radio lobes. To confirm the restarted nature in each of the candidate sources, we obtained follow-up observations with the Karl. G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at higher resolution to observe the inner lobes or restarted jets, the confirmation of which created a robust sample of 33 DDRGs. We created a comparison sample of 777 RLAGN, matching the luminosity distribution of the DDRG sample, and compared the optical and infrared magnitudes and colours of their host galaxies. Results. We find that there is no statistically significant difference in the brightness of the host galaxies between double-doubles and single-cycle RLAGN. The DDRG and RLAGN samples also have similar distributions in WISE mid-infrared colours, indicating similar ages of stellar populations and dust levels in the hosts of DDRGs. We conclude that DDRGs and "normal" RLAGN are hosted by galaxies of the same type, and that DDRG activity is simply a normal part of the life cycle of RLAGN. Restarted jets, particularly for the class of low-excitation radio galaxies, rather than being a product of a particular event in the life of a host galaxy, must instead be caused by smaller scale changes, such as in the accretion system surrounding the black hole.


LOFAR observations of the XMM-LSS field

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A4

CL Hale, W Williams, MJ Jarvis, MJ Hardcastle, LK Morabito, TW Shimwell, C Tasse, PN Best, JJ Harwood, I Heywood, I Prandoni, HJA Rottgering, J Sabater, DJB Smith, RJ van Weeren


The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey IV. First Data Release: Photometric redshifts and rest-frame magnitudes

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A3

KJ Duncan, J Sabater, HJA Rottgering, MJ Jarvis, DJB Smith, PN Best, JR Callingham, R Cochrane, JH Croston, MJ Hardcastle, B Mingo, L Morabito, D Nisbet, I Prandoni, TW Shimwell, C Tasse, GJ White, WL Williams, L Alegre, KT Chyzy, G Gurkan, M Hoeft, R Kondapally, AP Mechev, GK Miley, DJ Schwarz, RJ van Weeren


LoTSS/HETDEX: Optical quasars I. Low-frequency radio properties of optically selected quasars

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 622 (2019) ARTN A11

G Gurkan, MJ Hardcastle, PN Best, LK Morabito, I Prandoni, MJ Jarvis, KJ Duncan, GC Rivera, JR Callingham, RK Cochrane, JH Croston, G Heald, B Mingo, S Mooney, J Sabater, HJA Rottgering, TW Shimwell, DJB Smith, C Tasse, WL Williams


Radio source extraction with PROFOUND

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 487 (2019) 3971-3989

CL Hale, ASG Robotham, LJM Davies, MJ Jarvis, SP Driver, I Heywood


PAHs as tracers of the molecular gas in star-forming galaxies

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY 482 (2019) 1618-1633

I Cortzen, J Garrett, G Magdis, D Rigopoulou, F Valentino, M Pereira-Santaella, F Combes, A Alonso-Herrero, S Toft, E Daddi, D Elbaz, C Gomez-Guijarro, M Stockmann, J Huang, C Kramer

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