News

10 September 2019

Ramy Aboushelbaya has been invited to address the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in October 2019. Ramy will summarise the pioneering research that he has conducted over the past three years during his DPhil in Atomic and Laser Physics. Photon-photon scattering in vacuum is one of the oldest and most intriguing predictions of quantum electrodynamics, as it would confirm what is called "vacuum polarization" and change our perception of what constitutes the vacuum itself.

4 July 2019

Professor Alexander Schekochihin has been awarded the Institute of Physics 2019 Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin Medal and Prize for elucidating the dynamics that regulate the properties of turbulent, magnetised laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

4 July 2019

Magnetic monopoles are fundamentally important but highly elusive elementary particles exhibiting quantised magnetic charge. The prospect for studying them has brightened in recent years with the theoretical realisation that, in certain classes of magnetic insulators, the thermally excited states exhibit all the characteristics of magnetic monopoles.

1 July 2019

Ian Shipsey the Henry Moseley Centenary Professor of Physics and Head of the Department of Physics has been awarded the Institute of Physics 2019 Chadwick Medal and Prize For his elucidation of the physics of heavy quarks, the development of the enabling instrumentation, and leadership of scientific collaborations.

28 June 2019

The European Commission has announced the funding of a new Innovative Training Network, led by Oxford University, which will train PhD students in Machine Learning Skills to address Climate Change.

iMIRACLI (innovative MachIne leaRning to constrain Aerosol-cloud CLimate Impacts) brings together leading climate and machine learning scientists across Europe with non-academic partners, such as Amazon and the MetOffice, to educate a new generation of climate data scientists.

27 June 2019

A collaboration of experimental physicists led by Prof. JC Séamus Davis (University of Oxford), theoretical physicists led by Prof. Eun-Ah Kim (Cornell University), and computer scientists led by Prof. E. Kathami (San Jose State University), developed and trained a new Machine Learning (ML) protocol, based on a suite of artificial neural networks (ANN), that is designed to recognize different types of electronic ordered states which are hidden within electronic quantum matter image-arrays.

7 June 2019

Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information. Although they form the technological basis of solid-state quantum computing, they are also its key limiting factor because conventional superconductors only work at temperatures near -270 C. This has motivated a worldwide race to try to discover higher temperature superconductors. Materials containing CuO2 crystal layers (cuprates) are, at present, the best candidate for highest temperature superconductivity, operating at approximately -120 C.

22 May 2019

The handling of non-spherical micron-sized objects is a challenge for the manufacturing industry and for the wider exploitation of nanomaterials. Current manipulation techniques consist of pick-and-place machines used to place microelectronic components onto circuit boards, and optical methods that use laser radiation to manipulate objects. Pick-and-place methods are unsuitable for objects smaller than 100 microns because electrostatic and Van der Waals attraction prevents their release.

19 May 2019

Alex Savin, a third year DPhil student in Prof Peter Norreys group in Atomic and Laser Physics, received the runner-up student presentation prize for his talk at the International Conference on High Energy Density science (ICHED 2019) conference in University College Oxford in April 2019. Alex's paper was entitled "Energy Absorption in the Laser-QED Regime" and described the interaction of multi-petawatt laser pulses with solid targets.

19 May 2019

Marko Mayr, a second-year DPhil student under the supervision of Prof Peter Norreys, was awarded a best poster competition prize by an expert panel at the Laser Plasma Accelerator Workshop, Split, Croatia, 6th -10th May 2019. Marko's poster was entitled "Wakefields in a Cluster Plasma" and described the research work he had conducted at the Clarendon Laboratory over the past eighteen months since he started his doctoral degree.

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