Sam Vinko

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Sam Vinko

Associate Professor

Sam Vinko is a Royal Society University Research Fellow and an Associate Professor in the Atomic and Laser Physics Department, and a Tutorial Fellow at Trinity College. He received his bachelor and master degrees from the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy in 2004 and 2007, and his DPhil from Oxford in 2011. Sam's research focuses on understanding how matter behaves in extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and density, in regimes where quantum effects and correlations are important. Most of his experimental research takes place on large-scale free-electron laser facilities around the world, such as FLASH in Germany, the LCLS in California, and FERMI in Italy. He is also active in computational physics, including in electronic structure modelling from first principles, atomic-kinetics simulations of intense x-ray interactions with matter, and on applying the latest data science approaches in machine learning to the interpretation of complex experimental data.

Sam Vinko is a Tutorial Fellow in Physics at Trinity College, teaching courses across the undergraduate physics syllabus. He also lectures on applications of density functional theory to high energy density physics systems as part of the Oxford graduate course.

My research interests focus around the experimental and ab initio, theoretical and computational study of strongly coupled systems, matter in extreme conditions, high energy density physics and the probing of matter using the latest generation XUV and X-ray free electron laser (FEL) light sources, such as FLASH in Germany, the LCLS in California, and FERMI in Italy.

My group is also heavily involved in computation physics, including developments related to electronic structure modelling from first principles, atomic-kinetics simulations of intense x-ray interactions with matter, and on applying the latest data science approaches in machine learning to the interpretation of complex experimental data, and to enable the speeding up physics simulations by many orders of magnitude.

Prospective candidates for DPhil studentships on both experimental and theoretical projects involving X-ray FELs and the study of matter in extreme conditions are encouraged to contact me for further information.