Publications by Tim Palmer


Experimental Non-Violation of the Bell Inequality

ENTROPY 20 (2019) ARTN 356

TN Palmer


Stochastic weather and climate models

Nature Reviews Physics Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1 (2019) 463-471

TN Palmer


The ECMWF ensemble prediction system: Looking back (more than) 25 years and projecting forward 25 years

Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society (2018)

T Palmer

© 2018 The Authors. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Royal Meteorological Society. This paper has been written to mark 25 years of operational medium-range ensemble forecasting. The origins of the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System are outlined, including the development of the precursor real-time Met Office monthly ensemble forecast system. In particular, the reasons for the development of singular vectors and stochastic physics – particular features of the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System - are discussed. The author speculates about the development and use of ensemble prediction in the next 25 years.


How confident are predictability estimates of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation?

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 145 (2019) 140-159

A Weisheimer, D Decremer, D MacLeod, C O'Reilly, TN Stockdale, S Johnson, TN Palmer


Scale-Selective Precision for Weather and Climate Forecasting

MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 147 (2019) 645-655

M Chantry, T Thornes, T Palmer, P Duben


Signal and noise in regime systems: A hypothesis on the predictability of the North Atlantic Oscillation

Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society (2019)

K Strommen, TN Palmer

© 2018 Royal Meteorological Society Studies conducted by the UK Met Office reported significant skill in predicting the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index with their seasonal prediction system. At the same time, a very low signal-to-noise ratio was observed, as measured using the “ratio of predictable components” (RPC) metric. We analyse both the skill and signal-to-noise ratio using a new statistical toy model, which assumes NAO predictability is driven by regime dynamics. It is shown that if the system is approximately bimodal in nature, with the model consistently underestimating the level of regime persistence each season, then both the high skill and high RPC value of the Met Office hindcasts can easily be reproduced. Underestimation of regime persistence could be attributable to any number of sources of model error, including imperfect regime structure or errors in the propagation of teleconnections. In particular, a high RPC value for a seasonal mean prediction may be expected even if the model's internal level of noise is realistic.


Estimates of flow-dependent predictability of wintertime Euro-Atlantic weather regimes in medium-range forecasts

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 144 (2018) 1012-1027

M Matsueda, TN Palmer


Choosing the Optimal Numerical Precision for Data Assimilation in the Presence of Model Error

JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN MODELING EARTH SYSTEMS 10 (2018) 2177-2191

S Hatfield, P Dueben, M Chantry, K Kondo, T Miyoshi, T Palmer


A power law for reduced precision at small spatial scales: Experiments with an SQG model

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 144 (2018) 1179-1188

T Thornes, P Duben, T Palmer


Improving Weather Forecast Skill through Reduced-Precision Data Assimilation

MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 146 (2018) 49-62

S Hatfield, A Subramanian, T Palmer, P Duben


The impact of stochastic parametrisations on the representation of the Asian summer monsoon

CLIMATE DYNAMICS 50 (2018) 2269-2282

K Strommen, HM Christensen, J Berner, TN Palmer


Seasonal to annual ocean forecasting skill and the role of model and observational uncertainty.

Quarterly journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. Royal Meteorological Society (Great Britain) 144 (2018) 1947-1964

S Juricke, D MacLeod, A Weisheimer, L Zanna, TN Palmer

Accurate forecasts of the ocean state and the estimation of forecast uncertainties are crucial when it comes to providing skilful seasonal predictions. In this study we analyse the predictive skill and reliability of the ocean component in a seasonal forecasting system. Furthermore, we assess the effects of accounting for model and observational uncertainties. Ensemble forcasts are carried out with an updated version of the ECMWF seasonal forecasting model System 4, with a forecast length of ten months, initialized every May between 1981 and 2010. We find that, for essential quantities such as sea surface temperature and upper ocean 300 m heat content, the ocean forecasts are generally underdispersive and skilful beyond the first month mainly in the Tropics and parts of the North Atlantic. The reference reanalysis used for the forecast evaluation considerably affects diagnostics of forecast skill and reliability, throughout the entire ten-month forecasts but mostly during the first three months. Accounting for parametrization uncertainty by implementing stochastic parametrization perturbations has a positive impact on both reliability (from month 3 onwards) as well as forecast skill (from month 8 onwards). Skill improvements extend also to atmospheric variables such as 2 m temperature, mostly in the extratropical Pacific but also over the midlatitudes of the Americas. Hence, while model uncertainty impacts the skill of seasonal forecasts, observational uncertainty impacts our assessment of that skill. Future ocean model development should therefore aim not only to reduce model errors but to simultaneously assess and estimate uncertainties.


A SIMPLE PEDAGOGICAL MODEL LINKING INITIAL-VALUE RELIABILITY WITH TRUSTWORTHINESS IN THE FORCED CLIMATE RESPONSE

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 99 (2018) 605-614

TN Palmer, A Weisheimer


Flow dependent ensemble spread in seasonal forecasts of the boreal winter extratropics

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS 19 (2018) UNSP e815

D MacLeod, C O'Reilly, T Palmer, A Weisheimer


Introducing independent patterns into the Stochastically Perturbed Parametrization Tendencies (SPPT) scheme

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 143 (2017) 2168-2181

HM Christensen, S-J Lock, IM Moroz, TN Palmer


Variability in seasonal forecast skill of Northern Hemisphere winters over the twentieth century

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 44 (2017) 5729-5738

CH O'Reilly, J Heatley, D MacLeod, A Weisheimer, TN Palmer, N Schaller, T Woollings


The primacy of doubt: Evolution of numerical weather prediction from determinism to probability

JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN MODELING EARTH SYSTEMS 9 (2017) 730-734

T Palmer


Ensemble superparameterization versus stochastic parameterization: A comparison of model uncertainty representation in tropical weather prediction

JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN MODELING EARTH SYSTEMS 9 (2017) 1231-1250

AC Subramanian, TN Palmer


STOCHASTIC PARAMETERIZATION Toward a New View of Weather and Climate Models

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY 98 (2017) 565-587

J Berner, U Achatz, L Batte, L Bengtsson, A de la Camara, HM Christensen, M Colangeli, DRB Coleman, D Crommelin, SI Dolaptchiev, CLE Franzke, P Friederichs, P Imkeller, H Jarvinen, S Juricke, V Kitsios, F Lott, V Lucarini, S Mahajan, TN Palmer, C Penland, M Sakradzija, J-S von Storch, A Weisheimer, M Weniger, PD Williams, J-I Yano


Stochastic Subgrid-Scale Ocean Mixing: Impacts on Low-Frequency Variability

JOURNAL OF CLIMATE 30 (2017) 4997-5019

S Juricke, TN Palmer, L Zanna

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