Thomas Elliott

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Thomas Elliott

Visiting Researcher

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I am currently based at Imperial College London where I hold the Borland Fellowship in Mathematics. The information on this page is no longer actively maintained. Please visit my Imperial College webpage for details of my research, and arXiv for access to my publications.

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I presently hold the Lee Kuan Yew Research Fellowship at Nanyang Technological University, where I am a member of the Quantum and Complexity Science Initiative. My research is primarily focussed on the intersection between quantum physics and complexity science. My work approaches this union from both directions: studying the role that quantum devices can play in enhancing simulations of complex processes; and using tools from complexity theory to characterise and understand structure in quantum systems. I am also interested in quantum simulations and many-body systems more generally, especially the role that can be played by quantum measurement.

I was awarded my DPhil in Atomic and Laser Physics from the University of Oxford in 2016. I worked in the Frontiers of Quantum Physics group under the supervision of Vlatko Vedral. My thesis, "Topics in Quantum Measurement of Many-Body Systems", investigated a range of questions centred around the theme of measurement of many-body quantum systems, including techniques for probing atomic systems non-destructively, and using the quantum Zeno effect to engineer states and dynamics of atoms in optical lattices. I regularly visit the group when I am in the UK.

All my publications may be found here on the arXiv.

Research Highlights

  • We have shown that quantum devices can simulate certain continuous-time stochastic processes to an arbitrary precision with only a finite memory, a task which classically would require an unboundedly large memory. This opens up a whole new class of processes which may now benefit from quantum advantages. (npj Quantum Information,
    arXiv)
  • We uncovered a spatial mode structure that may be imprinted onto ultracold atoms in optical lattices through their interaction with light in cavities. These modes can be used to engineer states and dynamics of the atoms, and provides a possible method of measuring entanglement in quantum gases. (Phys. Rev. Lett., arXiv)
  • We designed a protocol for non-destructively measuring ultracold atomic systems using impurities. We showed that the dephasing of the impurity contains information about the density of the host system, that can be extracted to determine the expectation values of the density, its variance, and its correlations. (Phys. Rev. A, arXiv)
  • We investigated perturbations to the quantum Zeno effect when the measurements are frequent, but finitely-spaced in time. We found that these perturbations can give rise to correlated dynamical effects such as effective pair and long-range tunnelling events. (Phys. Rev. A, arXiv)
  • We applied a classical adaptation of tensor network methods to estimate the expectation values of observables appearing in stochastic processes. We found examples where our method can efficiently and accurately capture the system properties, whereas sampling methods such as Monte Carlo would require a number of trials that grows exponentially with system size. (Phys. Rev. Lett., arXiv)