Publications by Philip Burrows


Prototyping and beam tests of beam-feedback hardware for ILC collision optimisation

Proceedings of NANOBEAM 2005, 36th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop (2020) 217-230

R Barlow, M Dufau, A Kalinin, G Myatt, C Perry, P Burrows, G Christian, C Clarke, H Dabiri-Khah, A Hartin, S Molloy, C Swinson, G White, C Adolphsen, R Arnold, J Frisch, L Hendrickson, K Jobe, T Markiewicz, D McCormick, J Nelson, M Ross, A Seryi, S Smith, T Smith, M Woodley, M Woods

© 2020 Proceedings of NANOBEAM 2005, 36th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop. All rights reserved. The small vertical spot size at the International Linear Collider (ILC) will make the luminosity very sensitive to ground motion and facilities noise. Three generations of prototype feedback system have been developed and tested to correct for the relative beam misalignment caused by this. These systems were based on fast analogue beam position monitor (BPM) processors aimed at correcting the beam within the short (~ 270 ns) bunch crossing of the warm (X-band) machine. Future generations of feedback prototype will be aimed towards the cold (superconducting) ILC design, where a much longer bunch train of ~ 1 ms would allow the use of a digital processor to employ more sophisticated feedback algorithms. Details and results from the first three prototype systems are discussed and the development of a digital feedback processor for future tests is described. Plans to irradiate a BPM with background particles, of similar flux to that expected in the ILC interaction region, are also discussed.


A test facility for the international linear collider at SLAC end station a for prototypes of beam delivery and IR components

Proceedings of NANOBEAM 2005, 36th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop (2020) 271-274

MD Hildreth, R Erickson, J Frisch, C Hast, RK Jobe, L Keller, T Markiewicz, T Maruyama, D McCormick, J Nelson, T Nelson, N Phinney, T Raubenheimer, M Ross, A Seryi, S Smith, Z Szalata, P Tenenbaum, M Woodley, M Woods, D Angal-Kalinin, C Beard, C Densham, J Greenhalgh, F Jackson, A Kalinin, F Zimmermann, I Zagorodnov, Y Sugimoto, S Walston, J Smith, D Burton, R Tucker, N Shales, R Barlow, A Mercer, G Kurevlev, P Burrows, G Christian, C Clarke, A Hartin, S Molloy, G White, W Mueller, T Weiland, N Watson, D Bailey, D Cussans, Y Kolomensky, M Slater, M Thomson, D Ward, S Boogert, A Liapine, S Malton, DJ Miller, M Wing, R Arnold, N Sinev, E Torrence

© 2020 Proceedings of NANOBEAM 2005, 36th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop. All rights reserved. The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference[1].


Wakefields in a cluster plasma

Physical Review Special Topics: Accelerators and Beams American Physical Society 22 (2019) 113501

M Mayr, L Ceurvorst, M Kasim, J Sadler, B Spiers, K Glize, A Savin, N Bourgeois, F Keeble, A Ross, D Symes, R Aboushelbaya, R Fonseca, J Holloway, N Ratan, R Trines, R Wang, R Bingham, P Burrows, M Wing, R Pattathil, P Norreys

We report the first comprehensive study of large amplitude Langmuir waves in a plasma of nanometer-scale clusters. Using an oblique angle single-shot frequency domain holography diagnostic, the shape of these wakefields is captured for the first time. The wavefronts are observed to curve backwards, in contrast to the forwards curvature of wakefields in uniform plasma. Due to the expansion of the clusters, the first wakefield period is longer than those trailing it. The features of the data are well described by fully relativistic two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and by a quasianalytic solution for a one-dimensional, nonlinear wakefield in a cluster plasma.


The International Linear Collider: a European perspective

CERN Reports CERN (2019)

P Bambade, T Behnke, M Berggren, I Bozovic-Jelisavcic, P Burrows, M Caccia, P Colas, G Eigen, L Evans, A Faus-Golfe, B Foster, J Fuster, F Gaede, C Grojean, M Idzik, A Jeremie, T Lesiak, C Pagani, R Poeschl, F Richard, A Robson, T Schoerner-Sadenius, M Stanitzki, S Stapnes, H Weise

The International Linear Collider (ILC) being proposed in Japan is an electron-positron linear collider with an initial energy of 250 GeV. The ILC accelerator is based on the technology of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. This technology has reached a mature stage in the European XFEL project and is now widely used. The ILC will start by measuring the Higgs properties, providing high-precision and modelindependent determinations of its parameters. The ILC at 250 GeV will also search for direct new physics in exotic Higgs decays and in pair-production of weakly interacting particles. The use of polarised electron and positron beams opens new capabilities and scenarios that add to the physics reach. The ILC can be upgraded to higher energy, enabling precision studies of the top quark and measurement of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs self-coupling. The international - including European - interest for the project is very strong. Europe has participated in the ILC project since its early conception and plays a major role in its present development covering most of its scientific and technological aspects: physics studies, accelerator and detectors. The potential for a wide participation of European groups and laboratories is thus high, including important opportunities for European industry. Following decades of technical development, R&D;, and design optimisation, the project is ready for construction and the European particle physics community, technological centers and industry are prepared to participate in this challenging endeavour.


The International Linear Collider: a global project

CERN Reports CERN (2019)

T Behnke, A Bellerive, M Berggren, J Brau, M Breidenbach, I Bozovic-Jelisavcic, P Burrows, M Caccia, P Colas, D Denisov, G Eigen, L Evans, K Fujii, J Fuster, F Gaede, J Gao, P Grannis, C Grojean, A Hutton, M Idzik, S Komamiya, M Peskin, R Poeschl, F Richard, M Stanitzki

A large, world-wide community of physicists is working to realise an exceptional physics program of energy-frontier, electron-positron collisions with the International Linear Collider (ILC). This program will begin with a central focus on high-precision and model-independent measurements of the Higgs boson couplings. This method of searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model is orthogonal to and complements the LHC physics program. The ILC at 250 GeV will also search for direct new physics in exotic Higgs decays and in pair-production of weakly interacting particles. Polarised electron and positron beams add unique opportunities to the physics reach. The ILC can be upgraded to higher energy, enabling precision studies of the top quark and measurement of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs self-coupling. The key accelerator technology, superconducting radio-frequency cavities, has matured. Optimised collider and detector designs, and associated physics analyses, were presented in the ILC Technical Design Report, signed by 2400 scientists. There is a strong interest in Japan to host this international effort. A detailed review of the many aspects of the project is nearing a conclusion in Japan. Now the Japanese government is preparing for a decision on the next phase of international negotiations, that could lead to a project start within a few years. The potential timeline of the ILC project includes an initial phase of about 4 years to obtain international agreements, complete engineering design and prepare construction, and form the requisite international collaboration, followed by a construction phase of 9 years.


Measurements of stray magnetic fields at CERN for CLIC

JACoW IPAC Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 289-292

C Gohil, N Blaskovic Kraljevic, D Schulte, P Burrows, B Heilig


Mitigation of stray magnetic field effects in CLIC with passive shielding

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 293-296

C Gohil, NB Blaskovic Kraljevic, D Schulte, P Burrows


Investigation of CLIC 380 GeV post-collision line

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 528-531

RM Bodenstein, A Abramov, ST Boogert, P Burrows, LJ Nevay, D Schulte, R Tomás


Nanosecond-latency sub-micron resolution stripline beam position monitor signal processor for CLIC

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 2705-2708

RL Ramjiawan, P Burrows, GB Christian, C Perry


Spatially resolved dark current in high gradient traveling wave structures

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 2956-2959

J Paszkiewicz, W Wuensch, P Burrows


Top-quark physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

Journal of High Energy Physics Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2019 (2019) 3

H Abramowicz, N Alipour Tehrani, D Arominski, Y Benhammou, M Benoit, J-J Blaising, M Boronat, O Borysov, RR Bosley, I Božović Jelisavčić, I Boyko, S Brass, E Brondolin, P Bruckman de Renstrom, M Buckland, PN Burrows, M Chefdeville, S Chekanov, T Coates, D Dannheim, M Demarteau, H Denizli, G Durieux, G Eigen, K Elsener, E Fullana, J Fuster, M Gabriel, F Gaede, I García, J Goldstein, P Gomis Lopez, C Graf, S Green, C Grefe, C Grojean, A Hoang, D Hynds, A Joffe, J Kalinowski, G Kačarević, W Kilian, N van der Kolk, M Krawczyk, M Kucharczyk, E Leogrande, T Lesiak, A Levy, I Levy, L Linssen, AA Maier, V Makarenko, JS Marshall, V Martin, V Mateu, O Matsedonskyi, J Metcalfe, G Milutinović Dumbelović, RM Münker, Y Nefedov, K Nowak, A Nürnberg, M Pandurović, M Perelló, E Perez Codina, M Petric, F Pitters, T Price, T Quast, S Redford, J Repond, A Robson, P Roloff, E Ros, K Rozwadowska, A Ruiz-Jimeno, A Sailer, F Salvatore, U Schnoor, D Schulte, A Senol, G Shelkov, E Sicking, F Simon, R Simoniello, P Sopicki, S Spannagel, S Stapnes, R Ström, M Szalay, MA Thomson, B Turbiarz, O Viazlo, M Vicente, I Vila, M Vos, J Vossebeld, MF Watson, NK Watson, MA Weber, H Weerts, JD Wells, A Widl, M Williams, AG Winter, T Wojtoń, A Wulzer, B Xu, L Xia, T You, AF Żarnecki, L Zawiejski, C Zhang, J Zhang, Y Zhang, Z Zhang, A Zhemchugov


Real-time beam orbit stabilisation to 200 nanometres in single-pass mode using a high-precision dual-phase feedback system

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 4049-4052

P Burrows, GB Christian, C Perry, RL Ramjiawan


Intensity dependent effects in the ILC BDS

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 305-307

P Korysko, A Latina, P Burrows


Intensity dependent effects at ATF2, KEK

International Particle Accelerator Conference Proceedings JACoW Publishing (2019) 308-311

P Korysko, A Latina, P Burrows, A Faus-Golfe, K Kubo, T Okugi


The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) – Project Implementation Plan

CERN Yellow Reports CERN Publishing 4 (2019)

M Aicheler, P Burrows, NC Lasheras, M Draper, JA Osborne, D Schulte, S Stapnes, MJ Stuart

The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a TeV-scale high-luminosity linear e+e- collider under development by international collaborations hosted by CERN. This document provides an overview of the design, technology, and implementation aspects of the CLIC accelerator. For an optimal exploitation of its physics potential, CLIC is foreseen to be built and operated in stages, at centre-of-mass energies of 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV and 3 TeV, for a site length ranging between 11 km and 50 km. CLIC uses a Two-Beam acceleration scheme, in which normal-conducting high- gradient 12 GHz accelerating structures are powered via a high-current Drive Beam. For the first stage, an alternative with X-band klystron powering is also considered. CLIC accelerator optimisation, technical developments, and system tests have resulted in significant progress in recent years. Moreover, this has led to an increased energy efficiency and reduced power consumption of around 170 MW for the 380 GeV stage, together with a reduced cost estimate of approximately 6 billion CHF. The construction of the first CLIC energy stage could start as early as 2026 and first beams would be available by 2035, marking the beginning of a physics programme spanning 25–30 years and providing excellent sensitivity to Beyond Standard Model physics, through direct searches and via a broad set of precision measurements of Standard Model processes, particularly in the Higgs and top-quark sectors.


The Compact Linear e+e− Collider (CLIC): Accelerator and Detector

Cern European Organization for Nuclear Research -Reports- Cern (2018)

P Burrows


A massive open online course on particle accelerators

9th International Particle Accelerator Conference JACoW Publishing (2018) 512-515

N Deleru, A Faus-Golfe, E Metral, J Toes, H Schmickler, G Burt, C Darve, R Yogi, SP Møller, P Burrows

The TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area) project funded by the European Union 7th framework programme made a survey of provision of education and training in accelerator science in Europe. This survey highlighted the need for more training opportunities targeting undergraduate-level students. This need is now being addressed by the European Union H2020 project ARIES (Accelerator Research and Innovation for European Science and Society) via the preparation of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on particle accelerator science and engineering. We present here the current status of this project, the main elements of the syllabus, how it will be delivered, and the schedule for providing the course.


Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

European Physical Journal C Springer Nature 475 (2018)

H Abramowicz, A Abusleme, K Afanaciev, N Alipour Tehrani, Y Benhammou, B Bilki, J-J Blaising, M Boronat, O Borysov, I Božović-Jelisavčić, M Buckland, S Bugiel, TK Charles, D Dannheim, J Moroń, A Moszczyński, D Moya, RM Münker, A Münnich, AT Neagu, N Nikiforou, K Nikolopoulos, A Nürnberg, M Pandurović, B Pawlik

The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e+e− collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √s = 350 GeV, 1.4 and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e− → ZH) and WW-fusion (e+e− → Hνeν¯e), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width ΓH, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √s > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e+e− → t¯tH and e+e− → HHνeν¯e allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit.


Design and operation of a prototype interaction point beam collision feedback system for the International Linear Collider

PHYSICAL REVIEW ACCELERATORS AND BEAMS 21 (2018) ARTN 122802

RJ Apsimon, DR Bett, NB Kraljevic, RM Bodenstein, T Bromwich, PN Burrows, GB Christian, BD Constance, MR Davis, C Perry, R Ramjiawan


The Compact Linear e+e− Collider (CLIC) - 2018 Summary Report

CERN Yellow Reports: Monographs CERN (2018)

P Burrows, NC Lasheras, L Linssen, M Petric, A Robson, D Schulte, E Sicking, S Stapnes

The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a TeV-scale high-luminosity linear e+e- collider under development at CERN. Following the CLIC conceptual design published in 2012, this report provides an overview of the CLIC project, its current status, and future developments. It presents the CLIC physics potential and reports on design, technology, and implementation aspects of the accelerator and the detector. For an optimal exploitation of its physics potential, CLIC is foreseen to be built and operated in stages, at centre-of-mass energies of 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV and 3 TeV, respectively, for a site length ranging from 11 km to 50 km. CLIC uses a two-beam acceleration scheme, in which normal-conducting highgradient 12 GHz accelerating structures are powered via a high-current drive beam. For the first stage, an alternative with X-band klystron powering is also considered. CLIC accelerator optimisation, technical developments and system tests have resulted in significant progress in recent years. Moreover, this has led to an increased energy efficiency (power around 170MW) for the 380 GeV stage, together with a reduced cost estimate at the level of 6 billion CHF. The detector concept, which matches the physics performance requirements and the CLIC experimental conditions, has been refined using improved software tools for simulation and reconstruction. Significant progress has been made on detector technology developments for the tracking and calorimetry systems. A wide range of CLIC physics studies has been conducted, both through full detector simulations with overlay of beaminduced backgrounds, and through parametric studies, together providing a broad overview of the CLIC physics potential. Each of the three energy stages adds cornerstones of the full CLIC physics programme, such as Higgs width and couplings, top-quark properties, Higgs self-coupling, direct searches, and many precision electroweak measurements. The interpretation of the combined results gives crucial and accurate insight into new physics, largely complementary to LHC and HL-LHC. The construction of the first CLIC energy stage could start by 2026. First beams would be available by 2035, marking the beginning of a broad CLIC physics programme spanning 25–30 years.

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