Outreach news

The Virus Factory
7 December 2020

How 10-year-olds are getting a taste of cutting-edge science

A programme run by the Department of Physics at Oxford is giving pupils in years 5 and 6 the opportunity to take part in a real science research project, learn how scientists study viruses and meet the scientists themselves.

Challenges and changes mini-series
3 November 2020

The Department of Physics is running a new mini-series of lectures entitled ‘Challenges and Changes’ and hosted by Dr Alex Ramadan [she/her].

A screen shot of a video call between participants at this year's summer school
7 October 2020

‘Ensuring that our doors are open to all is something that we are continually working on,’ says Kathryn Boast, Access Officer for the Department of Physics. ‘Showing young people what it means to be a physicist – or someone who supports a physicist’s work – is an important aspect of demystifying this world and that’s why, in spite of COVID-19, we went ahead with our annual summer school this year.’

Screen shot of participants in this year's Department of Physics summer school
7 October 2020

Physics can be a hard sell. Just like its stablemate, maths, people can be quick to write it off as not for them – but yet is everything and everywhere. It’s fascinating. It’s life and the universe. And, yes, it is also quite hard. Faced with such an uphill battle, how does the Department of Physics outreach team ‘reach out’ to school children and community groups to convince them otherwise? To encourage different voices into the field? What does the team do to achieve its objectives of increasing diversity in STEM for school children and increasing access for disadvantaged students?

31 January 2020

Ever wondered how you can measure the speed of light with marshmallows or wanted to find out more about the largest telescope on Earth? The Department of Physics opened its doors for its annual Stargazing event on Saturday 25 January and welcomed some 1,209 keen and curious visitors of all ages.

1 November 2019

How do we transform our research from something hidden in our labs into a technology you can use? In October, we shared some of our secrets through our Physics: Lab to Life initiative as part of the IF Oxford science festival. We opened our doors to some 200 curious teenagers and adults so they could find out more about physics and how it impacts daily life. Visitors were able to listen to lectures as well as take tours of our laboratories and speak to the physicists themselves about their work, how they go about it and what impact it might have on society.

18 October 2019

Researchers worked with young people and community groups in Oxford to design and build colourful creations inspired by our exciting space-related science for this year’s Cowley Road Carnival, thanks to funding from STFC.

The carnival takes place every year and regularly attracts 50,000 people. This year’s event, which was held on 7th July 2019, had the theme of ‘Space is the Place’ and celebrated the exciting work being carried out by scientists in and around Oxford, and commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing in July 1969.

20 September 2019

Scientists at the University of Oxford are working with students to write new GCSE and A-level maths practice questions that help to integrate climate change into the school curriculum.

23 July 2019

Quantum 101 was an exciting opportunity for students, aged 12-15, to explore the weird and wonderful world of quantum physics. Students had the chance to work with researchers in the field of quantum physics and explore some of its real-world applications now and in the future.

Dr Kathryn Boast, Quantum Materials Outreach Officer, comments on why she got involved with the day.

9 April 2019

The way we understand the universe is influenced by many women both past and present, so during British Science Week we ran a “Women in Astronomy” study day for 57 girls aged 13-16 years, providing them with the opportunity to find out more about women in astronomy and their amazing work. Participants gained insight into how we study the cosmos and they had the opportunity to meet women astronomers working in Oxford. The event aimed to promote women into astronomy and allowed the girls to consider whether a career in astronomy might be for them!

Pages