Student news

Professor Myles Padgett, Kelvin Chair of Natural Philosophy and Vice Principal (Research), University of Glasgow
26 May (3.30pm): ‘Ghost Imaging with Quantum Light’
Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, followed by tea/coffee in the Clarendon Labs Common Room

Ghost imaging and ghost diffraction were first demonstrated by Shih and co-workers using photon pairs created by parametric down-conversion. They were able to obtain an image or a diffraction pattern using photons that had never interacted with the object, relying instead on the correlations with photons that have.

Congratulations to Luke Ceurvorst who recently won the best poster prize at the 44th IoP Plasma Physics Conference on channelling results from OMEGA EP.

Many congratulations to Subir Sarkar who has been awarded the IUPAP-TIFR Homi Bhabha Medal and Prize 2017.

This prize is awarded for distinguished contributions in high energy cosmic ray physics and astro-particle physics.

You can read more here

Prof Howard Milchberg, University of Maryland
10 Mar: ‘Spatio-temporal Optical Vortices’
3.30pm in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre

Physics Colloquia Series – Astor Lecture

Plasma physics helps in establishing an upper bound for the photon mass
Dr. Dmitri D. Ryutov
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Tuesday, 7 March 2017 at 14.00

Professor Val Gibson, Cambridge, will present this Friday’s Physics Colloquium entitled ‘The Beauty of Flavour - Latest results from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider’ at the usual time of 3.30pm in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre (3 February 2017). Tea & Coffee will follow in the Clarendon Labs Common Room.

The behaviour of the early universe just after the Big Bang is one of the most intriguing basic questions in all of science, and is extraordinarily difficult to answer because of insurmountable issues associated with replaying the Big Bang in the laboratory. One route towards the answer -- which lies at the intersection between cosmology and materials physics -- is to use laboratory materials to test the so-called "Kibble-Zurek" scaling laws proposed for the formation of defects such as cosmic strings in the early universe.

The early 1960s witnessed a wealth of elementary particles described in terms of simple combinations of a few more elementary units, dubbed quarks. The known mesons and baryons could all be described as states of quark-antiquark or three quarks. However, it was not understood why certain more elaborate combinations, such as (two quarks + two antiquarks) or (four quarks + one antiquark) had not been observed. It has taken nearly half a century, but these "exotic" particles are now beginning to be seen and understood.