Publications


Loops and spurs: The angular power spectrum of the Galactic synchrotron background

ArXiv (2013)

P Mertsch, S Sarkar

We present a new model of the diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation, concentrating on its angular anisotropies. While previous studies have focussed on either the variation of the emissivity on large (kpc) scales, or on fluctuations due to MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium, we unify these approaches to match the angular power spectrum. We note that the usual turbulence cascade calculation ignores spatial correlations at the injection scale due to compression of the interstellar medium by old supernova remnants -- the 'radio loops', only four of which are visible by eye in radio maps. This new component naturally provides the otherwise missing power on intermediate and small scales in the all-sky map at 408 MHz. Our model can enable more reliable subtraction of the synchrotron foreground for studies of CMB anisotropies (both in temperature and polarisation) or searches for dark matter annihilation. We conclude with some remarks on the relevance to modelling of the polarised foreground.


Simulation of X-ray scattering diagnostics in multi-dimensional plasma

High Energy Density Physics 9 (2013) 510-515

I Golovkin, JJ MacFarlane, P Woodruff, I Hall, G Gregori, J Bailey, E Harding, T Ao, S Glenzer

X-ray scattering is a powerful diagnostic technique that has been used in a variety of experimental settings to determine the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter. In order to maximize the intensity of the scattered signal, the x-ray source is often placed in close proximity to the target plasma. Therefore, the interpretation of the experimental data can become complicated by the fact that the detector records photons scattered at different angles from points within the plasma volume. In addition, the target plasma that is scattering the x-rays can have significant temperature and density gradients. To address these issues, we have developed the capability to simulate x-ray scattering for realistic experimental configurations where the effects of plasma non-uniformities and a range of x-ray scattering angles are included. We will discuss the implementation details and show results relevant to previous and ongoing experimental investigations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


A New Era in Gamma-Ray Astronomy with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS 43 (2013) 1-2

J Hinton, S Sarkar, D Torres, J Knapp


The ATLAS3D Project - XXIII. Angular momentum and nuclear surface brightness profiles

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 433 (2013) 2812-2839

D Krajnović, AM Karick, RL Davies, T Naab, M Sarzi, E Emsellem, M Cappellari, P Serra, PT de Zeeuw, N Scott, RM McDermid, A-M Weijmans, TA Davis, K Alatalo, L Blitz, M Bois, M Bureau, F Bournaud, A Crocker, P-A Duc, S Khochfar, H Kuntschner, R Morganti, T Oosterloo, LM Young

We investigate nuclear light profiles in 135 ATLAS3D galaxies for which the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging is available and compare them to the large-scale kinematics obtained with the SAURONintegral-field spectrograph. Specific angular momentum, λR, correlateswith the shape of nuclear light profiles, where, as suggested by previous studies, cores are typically found in slow rotators and core-less galaxies are fast rotators. As also shown before, cores are found only in massive galaxies and only in systems with the stellar mass (measured via dynamical models) M ≳ 8 × 1010 M· Based on our sample, we, however, see no evidence for a bimodal distribution of nuclear slopes. The best predictor for finding a core is based on the stellar velocity dispersion within an effective radius, se, and specific angular momentum, where cores are found for λR ≲ 0.25 and σe ≳ 160 kms-1. We estimate that only about 10 per cent of nearby early-type galaxies contain cores. Furthermore, we show that there is a genuine population of fast rotators with cores. We also show that core fast rotators are morphologically, kinematically and dynamically different from core slow rotators. The cores of fast rotators, however, could harbour black holes of similar masses to those in core slow rotators, but typically more massive than those found in core-less fast rotators. Cores of both fast and slow rotators are made of old stars and found in galaxies typically lacking molecular or atomic gas (with a few exceptions). Core-less galaxies, and especially core-less fast rotators, are underluminous in the diffuse X-ray emission, but the presence of a core does not imply high X-ray luminosities. Additionally, we postulate (as many of these galaxies lack HST imaging) a possible population of core-less galaxies among slow rotators, which cannot be explained as face-on discs, but comprise a genuine sub-population of slow rotators. These galaxies are typically less massive and flatter than core slow rotators, and show evidence for dynamical cold structures and exponential photometric components. Based on our findings, major nondissipative (gas-poor) mergers together with black hole binary evolution may not be the only path for formation of cores in early-type galaxies. We discuss possible processes for formation of cores and their subsequent preservation. © 2013 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Evidence for high-energy extraterrestrial neutrinos at the icecube detector

Science 342 (2013)

MG Aartsen, R Abbasi, Y Abdou, M Ackermann, J Adams, JA Aguilar, M Ahlers, D Altmann, J Auffenberg, X Bai, M Baker, SW Barwick, V Baum, R Bay, JJ Beatty, S Bechet, J Becker Tjus, K-H Becker, ML Benabderrahmane, S BenZvi, P Berghaus, D Berley, E Bernardini, A Bernhard, D Bertrand, DZ Besson, G Binder, D Bindig, M Bissok, E Blaufuss, J Blumenthal, DJ Boersma, S Bohaichuk, C Bohm, D Bose, S Böser, O Botner, L Brayeur, H-P Bretz, AM Brown, R Bruijn, J Brunner, M Carson, J Casey, M Casier, D Chirkin, A Christov, B Christy, K Clark, F Clevermann, S Coenders, S Cohen, DF Cowen, AH Cruz Silva, M Danninger, J Daughhetee, JC Davis, M Day, C De Clercq, S De Ridder, P Desiati, KD De Vries, M De With, T DeYoung, JC Díaz-Vélez, M Dunkman, R Eagan, B Eberhardt, B Eichmann, J Eisch, RW Ellsworth, S Euler, PA Evenson, O Fadiran, AR Fazely, A Fedynitch, J Feintzeig, T Feusels, K Filimonov, C Finley, T Fischer-Wasels, S Flis, A Franckowiak, K Frantzen, T Fuchs, TK Gaisser, J Gallagher, L Gerhardt, L Gladstone, T Glüsenkamp, A Goldschmidt, G Golup, JG Gonzalez, JA Goodman, D Góra, DT Grandmont, D Grant, A Groß, C Ha, A Haj Ismail, P Hallen, A Hallgren, F Halzen, K Hanson, D Heereman, D Heinen, K Helbing, R Hellauer, S Hickford, GC Hill, KD Hoffman, R Hoffmann, A Homeier, K Hoshina, W Huelsnitz, PO Hulth, K Hultqvist, S Hussain, A Ishihara, E Jacobi, J Jacobsen, K Jagielski, GS Japaridze, K Jero, O Jlelati, B Kaminsky, A Kappes, T Karg, A Karle, JL Kelley, J Kiryluk, J Kläs, SR Klein, J-H Köhne, G Kohnen, H Kolanoski, L Köpke, C Kopper, S Kopper, DJ Koskinen, M Kowalski, M Krasberg, K Krings, G Kroll, J Kunnen, N Kurahashi, T Kuwabara, M Labare, H Landsman, MJ Larson, M Lesiak-Bzdak, M Leuermann, J Leute, J Lünemann, J Madsen, G Maggi, R Maruyama, K Mase, HS Matis, F McNally, K Meagher, M Merck, T Meures, S Miarecki, E Middell, N Milke, J Miller, L Mohrmann, T Montaruli, R Morse, R Nahnhauer, U Naumann, H Niederhausen, SC Nowicki, DR Nygren, A Obertacke, S Odrowski, A Olivas, A O'Murchadha, L Paul, JA Pepper, C De Pérez Los Heros, C Pfendner, D Pieloth, E Pinat, J Posselt, PB Price, GT Przybylski, L Rädel, M Rameez, K Rawlins, P Redl, R Reimann, E Resconi, W Rhode, M Ribordy, M Richman, B Riedel, JP Rodrigues, C Rott, T Ruhe, B Ruzybayev, D Ryckbosch, SM Saba, T Salameh, H-G Sander, M Santander, S Sarkar, K Schatto, F Scheriau, T Schmidt, M Schmitz, S Schoenen, S Schöneberg, A Schönwald, A Schukraft, L Schulte, O Schulz, D Seckel, Y Sestayo, S Seunarine, R Shanidze, C Sheremata, MWE Smith, D Soldin, GM Spiczak, C Spiering, M Stamatikos, T Stanev, A Stasik, T Stezelberger, RG Stokstad, A Stößl, EA Strahler, R Ström, GW Sullivan, H Taavola, I Taboada, A Tamburro, A Tepe, S Ter-Antonyan, G Tešić, S Tilav, PA Toale, S Toscano, E Unger, M Usner, N Van Eijndhoven, A Van Overloop, J Van Santen, M Vehring, M Voge, M Vraeghe, C Walck, T Waldenmaier, M Wallraff, C Weaver, M Wellons, C Wendt, S Westerhoff, N Whitehorn, K Wiebe, CH Wiebusch, DR Williams, H Wissing, M Wolf, TR Wood, K Woschnagg, DL Xu, XW Xu, JP Yanez, G Yodh, S Yoshida, P Zarzhitsky, J Ziemann, S Zierke, M Zoll

We report on results of an all-sky search for high-energy neutrino events interacting within the IceCube neutrino detector conducted between May 2010 and May 2012. The search follows up on the previous detection of two PeV neutrino events, with improved sensitivity and extended energy coverage down to about 30 TeV. Twenty-six additional events were observed, substantially more than expected from atmospheric backgrounds. Combined, both searches reject a purely atmospheric origin for the 28 events at the 4σ level. These 28 events, which include the highest energy neutrinos ever observed, have flavors, directions, and energies inconsistent with those expected from the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. These properties are, however, consistent with generic predictions for an additional component of extraterrestrial origin.


The ATLAS3D project - XVII. Linking photometric and kinematic signatures of stellar discs in early-type galaxies

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 432 (2013) 1768-1795

D Krajnović, K Alatalo, L Blitz, M Bois, F Bournaud, M Bureau, M Cappellari, RL Davies, TA Davis, PT de Zeeuw, P-A Duc, E Emsellem, S Khochfar, H Kuntschner, RM McDermid, R Morganti, T Naab, T Oosterloo, M Sarzi, N Scott, P Serra, A-M Weijmans, LM Young

We analyse the morphological structures in galaxies of the ATLAS3D sample by fitting a single Sérsic profile and decomposing all non-barred objects (180 of 260 objects) in two components parametrized by an exponential and a general Sérsic function. The aim of this analysis is to look for signatures of discs in light distributions of nearby early-type galaxies and compare them to kinematic properties. Using Sérsic index from single-component fits for a distinction between slow and fast rotators, or even late- and early-type galaxies, is not recommended. Assuming that objects with n > 3 are slow rotators (or ellipticals), there is only a 22 per cent probability to correctly classify objects as slow rotators (or 37 per cent of previously classified as ellipticals). We show that exponential sub-components, as well as light profiles fitted with only a single component of a low Sérsic index, can be linked with the kinematic evidence for discs in early-type galaxies. The median disc-to-total light ratio for fast and slow rotators is 0.41 and 0.0, respectively. Similarly, the median Sérsic indices of the bulge (general Sérsic component) are 1.7 and 4.8 for fast and slow rotators, respectively. Overall, discs or disc-like structures are present in 83 per cent of early-type galaxies which do not have bars, and they show a full range of disc-to-total light ratios. Discs in early-type galaxies contribute with about 40 per cent to the total mass of the analysed (non-barred) objects. The decomposition into discs and bulges can be used as a rough approximation for the separation between fast and slow rotators, but it is not a substitute, as there is only a 59 per cent probability to correctly recognize slow rotators. We find trends between the angular momentum and the disc-to-total light ratios and the Sérsic index of the bulge, in the sense that high angular momentum galaxies have large disc-to-total light ratios and small bulge indices, but there is none between the angular momentum and the global Sérsic index. We investigate the inclination effects on the decomposition results and confirm that strong exponential profiles can be distinguished even at low inclinations, but medium-size discs are difficult to quantify using photometry alone at inclinations lower than ∼50°. Kinematics (i.e. projected angular momentum) remains the best approach to mitigate the influence of the inclination effects.We also find weak trends with mass and environmental density, where disc-dominated galaxies are typically less massive and found at all densities, including the densest region sampled by the ATLAS3D sample. © 2012 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Galactic kinematics and dynamics from RAVE stars

ArXiv (2013)

J Binney, B Burnett, G Kordopatis, M Steinmetz, G Gilmore, O Bienayme, J Bland-Hawthorn, B Famaey, EK Grebel, A Helmi, J Navarro, Q Parker, WA Reid, G Seabroke, F Watson, MEK Williams, RFG Wyse, T Zwitter

We analyse the kinematics of ~400000 RAVE stars. We split the sample into hot and cold dwarfs, red-clump and non-clump giants. The kinematics of the clump giants are consistent with being identical with those of non-clump giants. We fit Gaussian velocity ellipsoids to the meridional-plane components of velocity of each star class and give formulae from which the shape and orientation of the velocity ellipsoid can be determined at any location. The data are consistent with the giants and the cool dwarfs sharing the same velocity ellipsoids; sigma_z rises from 21 kms in the plane to sim 55 kms at |z|=2 kpc, while sigma_r rises from 37 kms to 82 kms. At (R,z) the longest axis of one of these velocity ellipsoids is inclined to the Galactic plane by an angle ~0.8 arctan(z/R). We use a novel formula to obtain precise fits to the highly non-Gaussian distributions of v_phi components. We compare the observed velocity distributions with the predictions of a dynamical model fitted to the velocities of stars that lie within ~150 pc of the Sun and star counts towards the Galactic pole. The model accurately reproduces the non-Gaussian nature of the v_r and v_z distributions and provides excellent fits to the data for v_z at all locations. The model v_phi distributions for the cool dwarfs fit the data extremely well, while those for the hot dwarfs have displacements to low v_phi that grow with |z| from very small values near the plane. At |z|>0.5 kpc, the theoretical v_phi distributions for giants show a deficit of stars with large v_phi and the model v_r distributions are too narrow. Systematically over-estimating distances by 20 per cent introduces asymmetry into the model v_r and v_z distributions near the plane and but significantly improves the fits to the data at |z|>0.5 kpc. The quality of the fits lends credence to the assumed, disc-dominated, gravitational potential.


The ATLAS3D project - XVI. Physical parameters and spectral line energy distributions of the molecular gas in gas-rich early-type galaxies

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 432 (2013) 1742-1767

E Bayet, M Bureau, TA Davis, LM Young, AF Crocker, K Alatalo, L Blitz, M Bois, F Bournaud, M Cappellari, RL Davies, PT de Zeeuw, P-A Duc, E Emsellem, S Khochfar, D Krajnović, H Kuntschner, RM McDermid, R Morganti, T Naab, T Oosterloo, M Sarzi, N Scott, P Serra, A-M Weijmans

We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the molecular gas in a sample of 18 molecular gas-rich early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D sample. Our goal is to better understand the star formation processes occurring in those galaxies, starting here with the dense star-forming gas. We use existing integrated 12CO (1-0, 2-1), 13CO (1-0, 2-1), HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) observations and new 12 CO (3-2) single-dish data. From these, we derive for the first time the average kinetic temperature, H2 volume density and column density of the emitting gas in a significant sample of ETGs, using a non-local thermodynamical equilibrium theoretical model. Since the CO lines trace different physical conditions than of those the HCN and HCO+ lines, the two sets of lines are treated separately. For most of the molecular gas-rich ETGs studied here, the CO transitions can be reproduced with kinetic temperatures of 10-20 K, H2 volume densities of 103-4 cm-3 and CO column densities of 1018-20 cm-2. The physical conditions corresponding to the HCN and HCO+ gas component have large uncertainties and must be considered as indicative only. We also compare for the first time the predicted CO spectral line energy distributions and gas properties of our molecular gas-rich ETGs with those of a sample of nearby well-studied disc galaxies. The gas excitation conditions in 13 of our 18 ETGs appear analogous to those in the centre of theMilky Way, hence the star formation activity driving these conditions is likely of a similar strength and nature. Such results have never been obtained before for ETGs and open a new window to explore further star-formation processes in the Universe. The conclusions drawn should nevertheless be considered carefully, as they are based on a limited number of observations and on a simple model. In the near future, with higher CO transition observations, it should be possible to better identify the various gas components present in ETGs, as well as more precisely determine their associated physical conditions. To achieve these goals, we show here from our theoretical study, that mid-J CO lines [such as the 12CO (6-5) line] are particularly useful. © 2013 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Satellite Survival in Highly Resolved Milky Way Class Halos

ArXiv (2012)

S Geen, A Slyz, J Devriendt

Surprisingly little is known about the origin and evolution of the Milky Way's satellite galaxy companions. UV photoionisation, supernova feedback and interactions with the larger host halo are all thought to play a role in shaping the population of satellites that we observe today, but there is still no consensus as to which of these effects, if any, dominates. In this paper, we revisit the issue by re-simulating a Milky Way class dark matter (DM) halo with unprecedented resolution. Our set of cosmological hydrodynamic Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations, called the Nut suite, allows us to investigate the effect of supernova feedback and UV photoionisation at high redshift with sub-parsec resolution. We subsequently follow the effect of interactions with the Milky Way-like halo using a lower spatial resolution (50pc) version of the simulation down to z=0. This latter produces a population of simulated satellites that we compare to the observed satellites of the Milky Way and M31. We find that supernova feedback reduces star formation in the least massive satellites but enhances it in the more massive ones. Photoionisation appears to play a very minor role in suppressing star and galaxy formation in all progenitors of satellite halos. By far the largest effect on the satellite population is found to be the mass of the host and whether gas cooling is included in the simulation or not. Indeed, inclusion of gas cooling dramatically reduces the number of satellites captured at high redshift which survive down to z=0.


X-ray scattering from warm dense iron

High Energy Density Physics 9 (2013) 573-577

S White, G Nersisyan, B Kettle, TWJ Dzelzainis, K McKeever, CLS Lewis, A Otten, K Siegenthaler, D Kraus, M Roth, T White, G Gregori, DO Gericke, R Baggott, DA Chapman, K Wünsch, J Vorberger, D Riley

We have carried out X-ray scattering experiments on iron foil samples that have been compressed and heated using laser-driven shocks created with the VULCAN laser system at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory. This is the highest Z element studied in such experiments so far and the first time scattering from warm dense iron has been reported. Because of the importance of iron in telluric planets, the work is relevant to studies of warm dense matter in planetary interiors. We report scattering results as well as shock breakout results that, in conjunction with hydrodynamic simulations, suggest the target has been compressed to a molten state at several 100GPa pressure. Initial comparison with modelling suggests more work is needed to understand the structure factor of warm dense iron. © 2013.


The ATLAS3D project - XXII. Low-efficiency star formation in early-type galaxies: Hydrodynamic models and observations

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 432 (2013) 1914-1927

M Martig, AF Crocker, F Bournaud, E Emsellem, JM Gabor, K Alatalo, L Blitz, M Bois, M Bureau, M Cappellari, RL Davies, TA Davis, A Dekel, PT de Zeeuw, P-A Duc, J Falcón-Barroso, S Khochfar, D Krajnović, H Kuntschner, R Morganti, RM McDermid, T Naab, T Oosterloo, M Sarzi, N Scott, P Serra, KS Griffin, R Teyssier, A-M Weijmans, LM Young

We study the global efficiency of star formation in high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of gas discs embedded in isolated early-type and spiral galaxies. Despite using a universal local law to form stars in the simulations, we find that the early-type galaxies are offset from the spirals on the large-scale Kennicutt relation, and form stars two to five times less efficiently. This offset is in agreement with previous results on morphological quenching: gas discs are more stable against star formation when embedded in early-type galaxies due to the lower disc self-gravity and increased shear. As a result, these gas discs do not fragment into dense clumps and do not reach as high densities as in the spiral galaxies. Even if some molecular gas is present, the fraction of very dense gas (typically above 104 cm-3) is significantly reduced, which explains the overall lower star formation efficiency. We also analyse a sample of local early-type and spiral galaxies, measuring their CO and HI surface densities and their star formation rates as determined by their non-stellar 8 μm emission. As predicted by the simulations, we find that the early-type galaxies are offset from the Kennicutt relation compared to the spirals, with a twice lower efficiency. Finally, we validate our approach by performing a direct comparison between models and observations. We run a simulation designed to mimic the stellar and gaseous properties of NGC 524, a local lenticular galaxy, and find a gas disc structure and global star formation rate in good agreement with the observations. Morphological quenching thus seems to be a robust mechanism, and is also consistent with other observations of a reduced star formation efficiency in early-type galaxies in the COLD GASS survey. This lower efficiency of star formation is not enough to explain the formation of the whole red sequence, but can contribute to the reddening of some galaxies. © 2013 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


The IceCube Neutrino Observatory Part VI: Ice Properties, Reconstruction and Future Developments

ArXiv (2013)

I Collaboration, MG Aartsen, R Abbasi, Y Abdou, M Ackermann, J Adams, JA Aguilar, M Ahlers, D Altmann, J Auffenberg, X Bai, M Baker, SW Barwick, V Baum, R Bay, JJ Beatty, S Bechet, JB Tjus, KH Becker, M Bell, ML Benabderrahmane, S BenZvi, P Berghaus, D Berley, E Bernardini, A Bernhard, D Bertrand, DZ Besson, G Binder, D Bindig, M Bissok, E Blaufuss, J Blumenthal, DJ Boersma, S Bohaichuk, C Bohm, D Bose, S Böser, O Botner, L Brayeur, HP Bretz, AM Brown, R Bruijn, J Brunner, M Carson, J Casey, M Casier, D Chirkin, A Christov, B Christy, K Clark, F Clevermann, S Coenders, S Cohen, DF Cowen, AHC Silva, M Danninger, J Daughhetee, JC Davis, CD Clercq, SD Ridder, P Desiati, KDD Vries, MD With, T DeYoung, JC Díaz-Vélez, M Dunkman, R Eagan, B Eberhardt, J Eisch, RW Ellsworth, S Euler, PA Evenson, O Fadiran, AR Fazely, A Fedynitch, J Feintzeig, T Feusels, K Filimonov, C Finley, T Fischer-Wasels, S Flis, A Franckowiak, K Frantzen, T Fuchs, TK Gaisser, J Gallagher, L Gerhardt, L Gladstone, T Glüsenkamp, A Goldschmidt, G Golup, JG Gonzalez, JA Goodman, D Góra, DT Grandmont, D Grant, A Groß, C Ha, AH Ismail, P Hallen, A Hallgren, F Halzen, K Hanson, D Heereman, D Heinen, K Helbing, R Hellauer, S Hickford, GC Hill, KD Hoffman, R Hoffmann, A Homeier, K Hoshina, W Huelsnitz, PO Hulth, K Hultqvist, S Hussain, A Ishihara, E Jacobi, J Jacobsen, K Jagielski, GS Japaridze, K Jero, O Jlelati, B Kaminsky, A Kappes, T Karg, A Karle, JL Kelley, J Kiryluk, J Kläs, SR Klein, JH Köhne, G Kohnen, H Kolanoski, L Köpke, C Kopper, S Kopper, DJ Koskinen, M Kowalski, M Krasberg, K Krings, G Kroll, J Kunnen, N Kurahashi, T Kuwabara, M Labare, H Landsman, MJ Larson, M Lesiak-Bzdak, M Leuermann, J Leute, J Lünemann, J Madsen, G Maggi, R Maruyama, K Mase, HS Matis, F McNally, K Meagher, M Merck, P Mészáros, T Meures, S Miarecki, E Middell, N Milke, J Miller, L Mohrmann, T Montaruli, R Morse, R Nahnhauer, U Naumann, H Niederhausen, SC Nowicki, DR Nygren, A Obertacke, S Odrowski, A Olivas, M Olivo, A O'Murchadha, L Paul, JA Pepper, CPDL Heros, C Pfendner, D Pieloth, E Pinat, J Posselt, PB Price, GT Przybylski, L Rädel, M Rameez, K Rawlins, P Redl, R Reimann, E Resconi, W Rhode, M Ribordy, M Richman, B Riedel, JP Rodrigues, C Rott, T Ruhe, B Ruzybayev, D Ryckbosch, SM Saba, T Salameh, HG Sander, M Santander, S Sarkar, K Schatto, M Scheel, F Scheriau, T Schmidt, M Schmitz, S Schoenen, S Schöneberg, A Schönwald, A Schukraft, L Schulte, O Schulz, D Seckel, Y Sestayo, S Seunarine, R Shanidze, C Sheremata, MWE Smith, D Soldin, GM Spiczak, C Spiering, M Stamatikos, T Stanev, A Stasik, T Stezelberger, RG Stokstad, A Stößl, EA Strahler, R Ström, GW Sullivan, H Taavola, I Taboada, A Tamburro, A Tepe, S Ter-Antonyan, G Tešić, S Tilav, PA Toale, S Toscano, M Usner, DVD Drift, NV Eijndhoven, AV Overloop, JV Santen, M Vehring, M Voge, M Vraeghe, C Walck, T Waldenmaier, M Wallraff, R Wasserman, C Weaver, M Wellons, C Wendt, S Westerhoff, N Whitehorn, K Wiebe, CH Wiebusch, DR Williams, H Wissing, M Wolf, TR Wood, K Woschnagg, DL Xu, XW Xu, JP Yanez, G Yodh, S Yoshida, P Zarzhitsky, J Ziemann, S Zierke, M Zoll

Papers on ice properties, reconstruction and future developments submitted to the 33nd International Cosmic Ray Conference (Rio de Janeiro 2013) by the IceCube Collaboration.


Laminar shocks in high power laser interactions

40th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, EPS 2013 European Physical Society (EPS) 2 (2013) 850-853

RA Cairns, R Bingham, PA Norreys, RMGM Trines


Swirling around filaments: are large-scale structure vortices spinning up dark halos?

ArXiv (2013)

C Laigle, C Pichon, S Codis, Y Dubois, DL Borgne, D Pogosyan, J Devriendt, S Peirani, S Prunet, S Rouberol, A Slyz, T Sousbie

The kinematic analysis of dark matter and hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the vorticity in large-scale structure is mostly confined to, and predominantly aligned with their filaments, with an excess of probability of 20 per cent to have the angle between vorticity and filaments direction lower than 60 degrees relative to random orientations. The cross sections of these filaments are typically partitioned into four quadrants with opposite vorticity sign, arising from multiple flows, originating from neighbouring walls. The spins of halos embedded within these filaments are consistently aligned with this vorticity for any halo mass, with a stronger alignment for the most massive structures up to an excess of probability of 165 per cent. On large scales, adiabatic/cooling hydrodynamical simulations display the same vorticity in the gas as in the dark matter. The global geometry of the flow within the cosmic web is therefore qualitatively consistent with a spin acquisition for smaller halos induced by this large-scale coherence, as argued in Codis et al. (2012). In effect, secondary anisotropic infall (originating from the vortex-rich filament within which these lower-mass halos form) dominates the angular momentum budget of these halos. The transition mass from alignment to orthogonality is related to the size of a given multi-flow region with a given polarity. This transition may be reconciled with the standard tidal torque theory if the latter is augmented so as to account for the larger scale anisotropic environment of walls and filaments.


The ATLAS3D project - XIX. The hot gas content of early-type galaxies: Fast versus slow rotators

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 432 (2013) 1845-1861

M Sarzi, K Alatalo, L Blitz, M Bois, F Bournaud, M Bureau, M Cappellari, A Crocker, RL Davies, TA Davis, PT de Zeeuw, P-A Duc, E Emsellem, S Khochfar, D Krajnović, H Kuntschner, P-Y Lablanche, RM McDermid, R Morganti, T Naab, T Oosterloo, N Scott, P Serra, LM Young, A-M Weijmans

For early-type galaxies, the ability to sustain a corona of hot, X-ray-emitting gas could have played a key role in quenching their star formation history. A halo of hot gas may act as an effective shield against the acquisition of cold gas and can quickly absorb stellar mass loss material. Yet, since the discovery by the Einstein Observatory of such X-ray haloes around early-type galaxies, the precise amount of hot gas around these galaxies still remains a matter of debate. By combining homogeneously derived photometric and spectroscopic measurements for the early-type galaxies observed as part of the ATLAS3D integral field survey with measurements of their X-ray luminosity based on X-ray data of both low and high spatial resolution (for 47 and 19 objects, respectively) we conclude that the hot gas content of early-type galaxies can depend on their dynamical structure. Specifically, whereas slow rotators generally have X-ray haloes with luminosity LX, gas and temperature T values that are well in line with what is expected if the hot gas emission is sustained by the thermalization of the kinetic energy carried by the stellar mass loss material, fast rotators tend to display LX, gas values that fall consistently below the prediction of thismodel, with similar T values that do not scale with the stellar kinetic energy (traced by the stellar velocity dispersion) as observed in the case of slow rotators. Such a discrepancy between the hot gas content of slow and fast rotators would appear to reduce, or even disappear, for large values of the dynamical mass (above ∼3× 1011Mȯ), with younger fast rotators displaying also somewhat larger LX, gas values possibly owing to the additional energy input from recent supernovae explosions. Considering that fast rotators are likely to be intrinsically flatter than slow rotators, and that the few LX, gas-deficient slow rotators also happen to be relatively flat, the observed LX, gas deficiency in these objects would support the hypothesis whereby flatter galaxies have a harder time in retaining their hot gas, although we suggest that the degree of rotational support could further hamper the efficiency with which the kinetic energy of the stellar mass loss material is thermalized in the hot gas. We discuss the implications that a different hot gas content could have on the fate of both acquired and internally produced gaseous material, considering in particular how the LX, gas deficiency of fast rotators would make them more capable to recycle the stellar mass loss material into new stars than slow rotators. This would be consistent with the finding that molecular gas and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators across the entire ATLAS3D sample, and that fast rotators tend to have a larger specific dust mass content than slow rotators. © 2013 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Numerical modeling of the sensitivity of x-ray driven implosions to low-mode flux asymmetries

Physical Review Letters 110 (2013)

RHH Scott, DS Clark, DK Bradley, DA Callahan, MJ Edwards, SW Haan, OS Jones, BK Spears, MM Marinak, RPJ Town, PA Norreys, LJ Suter

The sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions, of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), to low-mode flux asymmetries is investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from low-order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the deuterium and tritium (DT) "ice" layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of implosion kinetic energy to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing the neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images of the hot spot self-emission indicate that P4 shapes may be unquantifiable for DT layered capsules. Instead the positive P4 asymmetry "aliases" itself as an oblate P2 in the x-ray images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed postshot two-dimensional simulations. © 2013 American Physical Society.


FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

High Energy Density Physics 9 (2013) 75-81

A Scopatz, M Fatenejad, N Flocke, G Gregori, M Koenig, DQ Lamb, D Lee, J Meinecke, A Ravasio, P Tzeferacos, K Weide, R Yurchak

We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


IONIZED ABSORBERS AS EVIDENCE FOR SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN COOLING OF THE LOWER GALACTIC CORONA

ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS 764 (2013) ARTN L21

F Fraternali, A Marasco, F Marinacci, J Binney


Impact of extended preplasma on energy coupling in kilojoule energy relativistic laser interaction with cone wire targets relevant to fast ignition

New Journal of Physics 15 (2013)

T Yabuuchi, R Mishra, C McGuffey, B Qiao, MS Wei, H Sawada, Y Sentoku, T Ma, DP Higginson, KU Akli, D Batani, H Chen, LA Gizzi, MH Key, AJ MacKinnon, HS McLean, PA Norreys, PK Patel, RB Stephens, Y Ping, W Theobald, C Stoeckl, FN Beg

Cone-guided fast ignition laser fusion depends critically on details of the interaction of an intense laser pulse with the inside tip of a cone. Generation of relativistic electrons in the laser plasma interaction (LPI) with a gold cone and their subsequent transport into a copper wire have been studied using a kJ-class intense laser pulse, OMEGA EP (850 J, 10 ps). Weobserved that the laser-pulse-energy-normalized copper K signal from the Cu wire attached to the Au cone is significantly reduced (by a factor of 5) as compared to that from identical targets using the Titan laser (150 J, 0.7 ps) with 60 × less energy in the prepulse. We conclude that the decreased coupling is due to increased prepulse energy rather than 10 ps pulse duration, for which this effect has not been previously explored. The collisional particle-in-cell code PICLS demonstrates that the preformed plasma has a significant impact on generation of electrons and their transport. In particular, a longer scale length preplasma significantly reduces the energy coupling from the intense laser to the wire due to the larger offset distance between the relativistic critical density surface and the cone tip as well as a wider divergence of source electrons. We also observed that laser-driven plasma ionization increase in the LPI region can potentially alter the electron density profile during the laser interaction, forcing the electron source to be moved farther away from the cone tip which contributes to the reduction of energy coupling. © IOP Publishing and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.


The role of collisions on mode competition between the two-stream and Weibel instabilities

Journal of Plasma Physics 79 (2013) 987-989

KA Humphrey, DC Speirs, R Bingham, RMGM Trines, P Norreys

We present results from numerical simulations conducted to investigate a potential method for realizing the required fusion fuel heating in the fast ignition scheme to achieving inertial confinement fusion. A comparison will be made between collisionless and collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the relaxation of a non-thermal electron beam through the two-stream instability. The results presented demonstrate energy transfer to the plasma ion population from the laser-driven electron beam via the nonlinear wave-wave interaction associated with the two-stream instability. Evidence will also be provided for the effects of preferential damping of competing instabilities such as the Weibel mode found to be detrimental to the ion heating process. © Cambridge University Press 2013.