Publications


Producing bright X-rays for imaging applications using a laser wakefield accelerator

Optics InfoBase Conference Papers Optical Society of American (OSA) (2014)

SPD Mangles, MS Bloom, J Bryant, JM Cole, A Döpp, S Kneip, H Nakamura, K Poder, MJV Streeter, J Wood, Z Najmudin, R Bendoyro, J Jiang, NC Lopes, C Russo, O Cheklov, K Ertel, S Hawkes, CJ Hooker, D Neely, PA Norreys, PP Rajeev, DR Rusby, RHH Scott, DR Symes, J Holloway, M Wing, JF Seely

We report on the generation of bright multi-keV betatron X-ray radiation using a GeV laser wakefield accelerator and investigate the use of these X-rays for various imaging applications. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


The Gaia-ESO Survey: processing FLAMES-UVES spectra

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 565 (2014) ARTN A113

GG Sacco, L Morbidelli, E Franciosini, E Majorca, S Randich, A Modigliani, G Gilmore, M Asplund, J Binney, P Bordfacio, J Drew, S Feltzing, A Ferguson, R Jeffries, G Micela, I Negueruela, T Prusti, H-W Rix, A Vallenari, E Alfaro, CA Prieto, C Babusiaux, T Bensby, R Blomme, A Bragaglia, E Flaccomio, P Francois, N Hambly, M Irwin, S Koposov, A Korn, A Lanzafame, F Pancino, A Recio-Blanco, R Smiljanic, S Van Eck, N Walton, M Bergemann, MT Costado, P de Laverny, U Heiter, V Hill, A Hourihane, R Jackson, P Jofre, J Lewis, K Lind, C Lardo, L Magrini, T Masseron, L Prisinzano, C Worley


Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: A path to the future of high-energy particle physics

Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Institute of Physics Publishing 56 (2014)

R Assmann, R Bingham, T Bohl, C Bracco, B Buttenschön, A Butterworth, A Caldwell, S Chattopadhyay, S Cipiccia, E Feldbaumer, RA Fonseca, B Goddard, M Gross, O Grulke, E Gschwendtner, J Holloway, C Huang, D Jaroszynski, S Jolly, P Kempkes, N Lopes, K Lotov, J Machacek, SR Mandry, JW McKenzie, M Meddahi, BL Militsyn, N Moschuering, P Muggli, Z Najmudin, TCQ Noakes, PA Norreys, E Öz, A Pardons, A Petrenko, A Pukhov, K Rieger, O Reimann, H Ruhl, E Shaposhnikova, LO Silva, A Sosedkin, R Tarkeshian, RMGN Trines, T Tückmantel, J Vieira, H Vincke, M Wing, G Xia

New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN - the AWAKE experiment - has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser-matter interactions

Journal of Computational Physics 260 (2014) 273-285

CP Ridgers, JG Kirk, R Duclous, TG Blackburn, CS Brady, K Bennett, TD Arber, AR Bell

In high-intensity (>1021 Wcm -2) laser-matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron-positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Black hole evolution: II. Spinning black holes in a supernova-driven turbulent interstellar medium

ArXiv (2014)

Y Dubois, M Volonteri, J Silk, J Devriendt, A Slyz

Supermassive black holes (BH) accrete gas from their surroundings and coalesce with companions during galaxy mergers, and both processes change the BH mass and spin. By means of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies, either idealised or embedded within the cosmic web, we explore the effects of interstellar gas dynamics and external perturbations on BH spin evolution. All these physical quantities were evolved on-the-fly in a self-consistent manner. We use a `maximal' model to describe the turbulence induced by stellar feedback to highlight its impact on the angular momentum of the gas accreted by the BH. Periods of intense star formation are followed by phases where stellar feedback drives large-scale outflows and hot bubbles. We find that BH accretion is synchronised with star formation, as only when gas is cold and dense do both processes take place. During such periods, gas motion is dominated by consistent rotation. On the other hand, when stellar feedback becomes substantial, turbulent motion randomises gas angular momentum. However BH accretion is strongly suppressed in that case, as cold and dense gas is lacking. In our cosmological simulation, at very early times (z>6), the galactic disc has not yet settled and no preferred direction exists for the angular momentum of the accreted gas, so the BH spin remains low. As the gas settles into a disc (6>z>3), the BH spin then rapidly reaches its maximal value. At lower redshifts (z<3), even when galaxy mergers flip the direction of the angular momentum of the accreted gas, causing it to counter-rotate, the BH spin magnitude only decreases modestly and temporarily. Should this be a typical evolution scenario for BH, it potentially has dramatic consequences regarding their origin and assembly, as accretion on maximally spinning BH embedded in thin Shakura-Sunyaev disc is significantly reduced.


Do high-redshift quasars have powerful jets?

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters Blackwell Publishing Ltd 442 (2014)

AC Fabian, SA Walker, A Celotti, G Ghisellini, P Mocz, KM Blundell, RG McMahon

Double-lobed radio galaxies a few hundreds of kpc in extent, like Cygnus A, are common at redshifts of 1-2, arising from some 10 per cent of the most powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). At higher redshifts, they are rare, with none larger than a few tens of kpc known above redshift z∼4. Recent studies of the redshift evolution of powerful jetted objects indicate that they may constitute a larger fraction of the AGN population above redshift 2 than that appears from a simple consideration of detected GHz radio sources. The radio band is misleading as the dramatic (1 + z)4 boost in the energy density of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) causes inverse Compton scattering to dominate the energy losses of relativistic electrons in the extended lobes produced by jets, making them strong X-ray, rather than radio, sources. Here, we investigate limits to X-ray lobes around two distant quasars, ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 at z = 7.1 and SDSS J1030+0524 at z = 6.3, and find that powerful jets could be operating yet be currently undetectable. Jets may be instrumental in the rapid build-up of billion Ṁ black hole at a rate that violates the Eddington limit. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


New distances to RAVE stars

ArXiv (2013)

J Binney, B Burnett, G Kordopatis, PJ McMillan, S Sharma, T Zwitter, O Bienayme, J Bland-Hawthorn, M Steinmetz, G Gilmore, MEK Williams, J Navarro, EK Grebel, A Helmi, Q Parker, WA Reid, G Seabroke, F Watson, RFG Wyse

Probability density functions are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N>=10. Single-Gaussian fits to the pdf in distance modulus suffice for roughly half the stars, with most of the other half having satisfactory two-Gaussian representations. As expected, early-type stars rarely require more than one Gaussian. The expectation value of distance is larger than the distance implied by the expectation of distance modulus; the latter is itself larger than the distance implied by the expectation value of the parallax. Our parallaxes of Hipparcos stars agree well with the values measured by Hipparcos, so the expectation of parallax is the most reliable distance indicator. The latter are improved by taking extinction into account. The effective temperature absolute-magnitude diagram of our stars is significantly improved when these pdfs are used to make the diagram. We use the method of kinematic corrections devised by Schoenrich, Binney & Asplund to check for systematic errors for general stars and confirm that the most reliable distance indicator is the expectation of parallax. For cool dwarfs and low-gravity giants <pi> tends to be larger than the true distance by up to 30 percent. The most satisfactory distances are for dwarfs hotter than 5500 K. We compare our distances to stars in 13 open clusters with cluster distances from the literature and find excellent agreement for the dwarfs and indications that we are over-estimating distances to giants, especially in young clusters.


Radiative shocks produced from spherical cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

Physics of Plasmas 20 (2013)

A Pak, L Divol, G Gregori, S Weber, J Atherton, R Bennedetti, DK Bradley, D Callahan, DT Casey, E Dewald, T Döppner, MJ Edwards, JA Frenje, S Glenn, GP Grim, D Hicks, WW Hsing, N Izumi, OS Jones, MG Johnson, SF Khan, JD Kilkenny, JL Kline, GA Kyrala, J Lindl, OL Landen, S Le Pape, T Ma, A Macphee, BJ Macgowan, AJ Mackinnon, L Masse, NB Meezan, JD Moody, RE Olson, JE Ralph, HF Robey, H-S Park, BA Remington, JS Ross, R Tommasini, RPJ Town, V Smalyuk, SH Glenzer, EI Moses

Spherically expanding radiative shock waves have been observed from inertially confined implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In these experiments, a spherical fusion target, initially 2 mm in diameter, is compressed via the pressure induced from the ablation of the outer target surface. At the peak compression of the capsule, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics indicate the formation of a central core, with a radius and ion temperature of ∼20 μm and ∼ 2 keV, respectively. This central core is surrounded by a cooler compressed shell of deuterium-tritium fuel that has an outer radius of ∼40 μm and a density of >500 g/cm3. Using inputs from multiple diagnostics, the peak pressure of the compressed core has been inferred to be of order 100 Gbar for the implosions discussed here. The shock front, initially located at the interface between the high pressure compressed fuel shell and surrounding in-falling low pressure ablator plasma, begins to propagate outwards after peak compression has been reached. Approximately 200 ps after peak compression, a ring of x-ray emission created by the limb-brightening of a spherical shell of shock-heated matter is observed to appear at a radius of ∼100 μm. Hydrodynamic simulations, which model the experiment and include radiation transport, indicate that the sudden appearance of this emission occurs as the post-shock material temperature increases and upstream density decreases, over a scale length of ∼10 μm, as the shock propagates into the lower density (∼1 g/cc), hot (∼250 eV) plasma that exists at the ablation front. The expansion of the shock-heated matter is temporally and spatially resolved and indicates a shock expansion velocity of ∼300 km/s in the laboratory frame. The magnitude and temporal evolution of the luminosity produced from the shock-heated matter was measured at photon energies between 5.9 and 12.4 keV. The observed radial shock expansion, as well as the magnitude and temporal evolution of the luminosity from the shock-heated matter, is consistent with 1-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Analytic estimates indicate that the radiation energy flux from the shock-heated matter is of the same order as the in-flowing material energy flux, and suggests that this radiation energy flux modifies the shock front structure. Simulations support these estimates and show the formation of a radiative shock, with a precursor that raises the temperature ahead of the shock front, a sharp μ m-scale thick spike in temperature at the shock front, followed by a post-shock cooling layer. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.


Simulation of X-ray scattering diagnostics in multi-dimensional plasma

High Energy Density Physics 9 (2013) 510-515

I Golovkin, JJ MacFarlane, P Woodruff, I Hall, G Gregori, J Bailey, E Harding, T Ao, S Glenzer

X-ray scattering is a powerful diagnostic technique that has been used in a variety of experimental settings to determine the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter. In order to maximize the intensity of the scattered signal, the x-ray source is often placed in close proximity to the target plasma. Therefore, the interpretation of the experimental data can become complicated by the fact that the detector records photons scattered at different angles from points within the plasma volume. In addition, the target plasma that is scattering the x-rays can have significant temperature and density gradients. To address these issues, we have developed the capability to simulate x-ray scattering for realistic experimental configurations where the effects of plasma non-uniformities and a range of x-ray scattering angles are included. We will discuss the implementation details and show results relevant to previous and ongoing experimental investigations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Probing the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at 100 GPa

Physical Review Letters 111 (2013)

D Kraus, J Vorberger, DO Gericke, V Bagnoud, A Blažević, W Cayzac, A Frank, G Gregori, A Ortner, A Otten, F Roth, G Schaumann, D Schumacher, K Siegenthaler, F Wagner, K Wünsch, M Roth

We present the first direct experimental test of the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at pressures around 100 GPa, using spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed graphite samples. Our results confirm the structure predicted by ab initio quantum simulations and demonstrate the importance of chemical bonds at extreme conditions similar to those found in the interiors of giant planets. The evidence presented here thus provides a firmer ground for modeling the evolution and current structure of carbon-bearing icy giants like Neptune, Uranus, and a number of extrasolar planets. © 2013 American Physical Society.


The wobbly Galaxy: Kinematics north and south with RAVE red-clump giants

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 436 (2013) 101-121

MEK Williams, M Steinmetz, J Binney, A Siebert, H Enke, B Famaey, I Minchev, RS de Jong, C Boeche, KC Freeman, O Bienaymé, J Bland-Hawthorn, BK Gibson, GF Gilmore, EK Grebel, A Helmi, G Kordopatis, U Munari, JF Navarro, QA Parker, W Reid, GM Seabroke, S Sharma, A Siviero, FG Watson, RFG Wyse, T Zwitter

TheRAdialVelocity Experiment survey, combined with proper motions and distance estimates, can be used to study in detail stellar kinematics in the extended solar neighbourhood (solar suburb). Using 72 365 red-clump stars, we examine the mean velocity components in 3D between 6 < R < 10 kpc and -2 < Z < 2 kpc, concentrating on north-south differences. Simple parametric fits to the (R, Z) trends for Vφ and the velocity dispersions are presented. We confirm the recently discovered gradient in mean Galactocentric radial velocity, VR, finding that the gradient is marked below the plane (δ(VR)/δR=-8 kms-1 kpc-1 for Z<0, vanishing to zero above the plane), with a Z gradient thus also present. The vertical velocity, VZ, also shows clear, large-amplitude (|VZ| = 17 km s-1) structure, with indications of a rarefaction- compression pattern, suggestive of wave-like behaviour. We perform a rigorous error analysis, tracing sources of both systematic and random errors. We confirm the north-south differences in VR and VZ along the line of sight, with the VR estimated independent of the proper motions. The complex three-dimensional structure of velocity space presents challenges for future modelling of the Galactic disc, with the Galactic bar, spiral arms and excitation of wave-like structures all probably playing a role. © 2013 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Galactic kinematics and dynamics from RAVE stars

ArXiv (2013)

J Binney, B Burnett, G Kordopatis, M Steinmetz, G Gilmore, O Bienayme, J Bland-Hawthorn, B Famaey, EK Grebel, A Helmi, J Navarro, Q Parker, WA Reid, G Seabroke, F Watson, MEK Williams, RFG Wyse, T Zwitter

We analyse the kinematics of ~400000 RAVE stars. We split the sample into hot and cold dwarfs, red-clump and non-clump giants. The kinematics of the clump giants are consistent with being identical with those of non-clump giants. We fit Gaussian velocity ellipsoids to the meridional-plane components of velocity of each star class and give formulae from which the shape and orientation of the velocity ellipsoid can be determined at any location. The data are consistent with the giants and the cool dwarfs sharing the same velocity ellipsoids; sigma_z rises from 21 kms in the plane to sim 55 kms at |z|=2 kpc, while sigma_r rises from 37 kms to 82 kms. At (R,z) the longest axis of one of these velocity ellipsoids is inclined to the Galactic plane by an angle ~0.8 arctan(z/R). We use a novel formula to obtain precise fits to the highly non-Gaussian distributions of v_phi components. We compare the observed velocity distributions with the predictions of a dynamical model fitted to the velocities of stars that lie within ~150 pc of the Sun and star counts towards the Galactic pole. The model accurately reproduces the non-Gaussian nature of the v_r and v_z distributions and provides excellent fits to the data for v_z at all locations. The model v_phi distributions for the cool dwarfs fit the data extremely well, while those for the hot dwarfs have displacements to low v_phi that grow with |z| from very small values near the plane. At |z|>0.5 kpc, the theoretical v_phi distributions for giants show a deficit of stars with large v_phi and the model v_r distributions are too narrow. Systematically over-estimating distances by 20 per cent introduces asymmetry into the model v_r and v_z distributions near the plane and but significantly improves the fits to the data at |z|>0.5 kpc. The quality of the fits lends credence to the assumed, disc-dominated, gravitational potential.


X-ray emission around the z=4.1 radio galaxy TNJ1338-1942 and the potential role of far-infrared photons in AGN Feedback

ArXiv (2013)

I Smail, K Blundell

We report the discovery in an 80-ks observation of spatially-extended X-ray emission around the high-redshift radio galaxy TNJ1388-1942 (z=4.11) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The X-ray emission extends over a ~30-kpc diameter region and although it is less extended than the GHz-radio lobes, it is roughly aligned with them. We suggest that the X-ray emission arises from Inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photons by relativistic electrons around the radio galaxy. At z=4.11 this is the highest redshift detection of IC emission around a radio galaxy. We investigate the hypothesis that in this compact source, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), which is ~700x more intense than at z~0 is nonetheless not the relevant seed photon field for the bulk of the IC emission. Instead, we find a tentative correlation between the IC emission and far-infrared luminosities of compact, far-infrared luminous high-redshift radio galaxies (those with lobe lengths of <100kpc). Based on these results we suggest that in the earliest phases of the evolution of radio-loud AGN at very high redshift, the far-infrared photons from the co-eval dusty starbursts occuring within these systems may make a significant contribution to their IC X-ray emission and so contribute to the feedback in these massive high-redshift galaxies.


Satellite Survival in Highly Resolved Milky Way Class Halos

ArXiv (2012)

S Geen, A Slyz, J Devriendt

Surprisingly little is known about the origin and evolution of the Milky Way's satellite galaxy companions. UV photoionisation, supernova feedback and interactions with the larger host halo are all thought to play a role in shaping the population of satellites that we observe today, but there is still no consensus as to which of these effects, if any, dominates. In this paper, we revisit the issue by re-simulating a Milky Way class dark matter (DM) halo with unprecedented resolution. Our set of cosmological hydrodynamic Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations, called the Nut suite, allows us to investigate the effect of supernova feedback and UV photoionisation at high redshift with sub-parsec resolution. We subsequently follow the effect of interactions with the Milky Way-like halo using a lower spatial resolution (50pc) version of the simulation down to z=0. This latter produces a population of simulated satellites that we compare to the observed satellites of the Milky Way and M31. We find that supernova feedback reduces star formation in the least massive satellites but enhances it in the more massive ones. Photoionisation appears to play a very minor role in suppressing star and galaxy formation in all progenitors of satellite halos. By far the largest effect on the satellite population is found to be the mass of the host and whether gas cooling is included in the simulation or not. Indeed, inclusion of gas cooling dramatically reduces the number of satellites captured at high redshift which survive down to z=0.


Visualizing electromagnetic fields in laser-produced counter-streaming plasma experiments for collisionless shock laboratory astrophysics

Physics of Plasmas 20 (2013)

NL Kugland, JS Ross, P-Y Chang, RP Drake, G Fiksel, DH Froula, SH Glenzer, G Gregori, M Grosskopf, C Huntington, M Koenig, Y Kuramitsu, C Kuranz, MC Levy, E Liang, D Martinez, J Meinecke, F Miniati, T Morita, A Pelka, C Plechaty, R Presura, A Ravasio, BA Remington, B Reville, DD Ryutov, Y Sakawa, A Spitkovsky, H Takabe, H-S Park

Collisionless shocks are often observed in fast-moving astrophysical plasmas, formed by non-classical viscosity that is believed to originate from collective electromagnetic fields driven by kinetic plasma instabilities. However, the development of small-scale plasma processes into large-scale structures, such as a collisionless shock, is not well understood. It is also unknown to what extent collisionless shocks contain macroscopic fields with a long coherence length. For these reasons, it is valuable to explore collisionless shock formation, including the growth and self-organization of fields, in laboratory plasmas. The experimental results presented here show at a glance with proton imaging how macroscopic fields can emerge from a system of supersonic counter-streaming plasmas produced at the OMEGA EP laser. Interpretation of these results, plans for additional measurements, and the difficulty of achieving truly collisionless conditions are discussed. Future experiments at the National Ignition Facility are expected to create fully formed collisionless shocks in plasmas with no pre-imposed magnetic field. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.


Linear structures in the core of the Coma cluster of galaxies

Science 341 (2013) 1365-1368

JS Sanders, AC Fabian, E Churazov, AA Schekochihin, A Simionescu, SA Walker, N Werner

The hot x-ray-emitting plasma in galaxy clusters is predicted to have turbulent motion, which can contribute around 10% of the cluster's central energy density. We report deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the Coma cluster core, showing the presence of quasi-linear high-density arms spanning 150 kiloparsecs, consisting of low-entropy material that was probably stripped from merging subclusters. Two appear to be connected with a subgroup of galaxies at a 650-kiloparsec radius that is merging into the cluster, implying coherence over several hundred million years. Such a long lifetime implies that strong isotropic turbulence and conduction are suppressed in the core, despite the unrelaxed state of the cluster. Magnetic fields are presumably responsible. The structures seen in Coma present insight into the past billion years of subcluster merger activity.


Implosion and heating experiments of fast ignition targets by Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers

EPJ Web of Conferences 59 (2013)

H Shiraga, S Fujioka, M Nakai, T Watari, H Nakamura, Y Arikawa, H Hosoda, T Nagai, M Koga, H Kikuchi, Y Ishii, T Sogo, K Shigemori, H Nishimura, Z Zhang, M Tanabe, S Ohira, Y Fujii, T Namimoto, Y Sakawa, O Maegawa, T Ozaki, KA Tanaka, H Habara, T Iwawaki, K Shimada, M Key, P Norreys, J Pasley, H Nagatomo, T Johzaki, A Sunahara, M Murakami, H Sakagami, T Taguchi, T Norimatsu, H Homma, Y Fujimoto, A Iwamoto, N Miyanaga, J Kawanaka, T Kanabe, T Jitsuno, Y Nakata, K Tsubakimoto, K Sueda, R Kodama, K Kondo, N Morio, S Matsuo, T Kawasaki, K Sawai, K Tsuji, H Murakami, N Sarukura, T Shimizu, K Mima, H Azechi

The FIREX-1 project, the goal of which is to demonstrate fuel heating up to 5 keV by fast ignition scheme, has been carried out since 2003 including construction and tuning of LFEX laser and integrated experiments. Implosion and heating experiment of Fast Ignition targets have been performed since 2009 with Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers. A deuterated polystyrene shell target was imploded with the 0.53- μm Gekko-XII, and the 1.053- μm beam of the LFEX laser was injected through a gold cone attached to the shell to generate hot electrons to heat the imploded fuel plasma. Pulse contrast ratio of the LFEX beam was significantly improved. Also a variety of plasma diagnostic instruments were developed to be compatible with harsh environment of intense hard x-rays (γ rays) and electromagnetic pulses due to the intense LFEX beam on the target. Large background signals around the DD neutron signal in time-of-flight record of neutron detector were found to consist of neutrons via (γ,n) reactions and scattered gamma rays. Enhanced neutron yield was confirmed by carefully eliminating such backgrounds. Neutron enhancement up to 3.5 × 107 was observed. Heating efficiency was estimated to be 10-20% assuming a uniform temperature rise model. © Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2013.


High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

EPJ Web of Conferences 59 (2013)

Y Sakawa, Y Kuramitsu, T Morita, T Kato, H Tanji, T Ide, K Nishio, M Kuwada, T Tsubouchi, H Ide, T Norimatsu, C Gregory, N Woolsey, K Schaar, C Murphy, G Gregori, A Diziere, A Pelka, M Koenig, S Wang, Q Dong, Y Li, H-S Park, S Ross, N Kugland, D Ryutov, B Remington, A Spitkovsky, D Froula, H Takabe

A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008)]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics. © Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2013.


A multi-dimensional Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code for arbitrarily anisotropic high-energy-density plasmas

PHYSICS OF PLASMAS 20 (2013) ARTN 056303

M Tzoufras, A Tableman, FS Tsung, WB Mori, AR Bell


Gamma-ray emission in near critical density plasmas

Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 55 (2013)

CS Brady, CP Ridgers, TD Arber, AR Bell

Previous work on the interaction of high power lasers with high density targets have identified that emission is primarily from interaction within the skin layer at the target front (e.g. Ridgers et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 165006). This mechanism is inefficient when compared to Reinjected Electron Synchrotron Emission (RESE) for laser interaction with low density solids (Brady et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 245006). However, these detailed analyses of the emission mechanisms were mainly based on 1D simulations and so did not incorporate some important 2D effects. In this paper these 1D emission mechanisms are confirmed to still exist in 2D with comparable properties and a new, intrinsically 2D, emission mechanism, termed edgeglow, is described which can convert 4-5% of the laser energy into gamma-ray energy. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.