Cheikh Mbengue

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Cheikh Mbengue

Post-doctoral Research Assistant

Biography

I obtained my PhD from California Institute of Technology in May 2015 for investigations of midlatitude storm track dynamics. I proffered a theory of storm track shifts in dry atmospheres. The implications for moist, Earth-like atmospheres were also explored. My PhD thesis was supervised by professor Tapio Schneider.

I am a post-doctoral research assistant in the atmospheric dynamics group in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics (AOPP) subdepartment. I work with professors Tim Woollings, Lesley Gray, and Helen Dacre on the NERC funded "SummerTime" project. This project seeks to broaden understanding of North Atlantic and European sector summertime variability, with the goal of improving seasonal-to-decadal predictions.

I employ a hierarchy of numerical models along with observations to understand the general circulation and its response to perturbations in the climate system. Other broad interests include computational fluid mechanics, atmospheric turbulence, and midlatitude, climate, and tropical dynamics.

Education

California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA.
2011-2015: Ph.D. Aeronautical Engineering
2009-2011: M.Sc. Aeronautical Engineering

University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK.
2007-2008: M.Sc. Criminology and Criminal Justice
2006-2007: M.Sc. Global Governance and Diplomacy

United States Military Academy,West Point, New York, USA.
2002-2006: B.Sc. Mechanical Engineering/Aeronautical Systems

Academic Employment

University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
2015-present: Post-doctoral Research Assistant

ETH-Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
2015: Post-doctoral Researcher

Monroe College, Castries, St. Lucia
2009: College Lecturer

Saint Mary's College, Castries, St. Lucia
2000-2002: High School Teacher

Selected Awards

  • 2009 Donald Willis Fellowship
  • 2006 Dennis H. Mahan Award
  • 2005 Rhodes Scholarship
  • 2005 The Cadet Roger A. Herndon Memorial Award

Research at AOPP

Weather forecast skill in the North Atlantic/European sector has improved more during winter than in summer. This is partly because there has been far more research on the wintertime circulation compared to summertime. Here, we seek to improve upon seasonal-to-decadal predictions by investigating the impact of the drivers of North Atlantic/European sector variability on the primary features of the general circulation. These features include the jets, storm tracks, extratropical cyclones, and synoptic and planetary scale waves.

We investigate the fundamental dynamics underpinning summertime variability and characterize the drivers of the forced and free modes of variability. We bridge the gap between weather and climate perspectives by marrying techniques from the two seemingly different endeavours and by synthesizing the results of analyses of mean fields with those from extratropical cyclone analysis.

Publications

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2015: Storm track shifts under climate change: toward a mechanistic understanding using local mean available potential energy. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, submitted.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2013: Storm track shifts under climate change: what can be learned from large-scale dry dynamics. Journal of Climate, 26, 9923-9930.

Conference Presentations

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2015: Links between the storm tracks and Hadley circulation response to climate change. SPARC workshop on storm tracks, Grindelwald, Switzerland.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2015: Storm track response to climate change: how the Hadley circulation influences shifts of the midlatitude storm tracks. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics Conference, 19.2, Minnesota, USA.

Mbengue, C., T. Schneider, K. Pressel, C.M. Kaul, Z. Tan, J. Teixeira, 2014: Investigating the diurnal phase of tropical precipitation using a hierarchy of models. EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, 16, 13959, Vienna, Austria.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2014: Storm track shifts under climate change. The Latsis Symposium, Zurich, Switzerland.

Mbengue, C., T. Schneider, K. Pressel, C.M. Kaul, Z. Tan, J. Teixeira, 2014: Investigating the diurnal phase of tropical precipitation using a hierarchy of models. The Latsis Symposium, Zurich, Switzerland.

Mbengue, C., T. Schneider, K. Pressel, C.M. Kaul, Z. Tan, J. Teixeira, 2014: Investigating the diurnal phase of tropical precipitation using a hierarchy of models. International Scientific Conference on the Global Water and Energy Cycle, 7-13, The Hague, The Netherlands.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2013: Storm track response to climate change: insights from simulations using an idealized dry GCM. EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, 15, 3454, Vienna, Austria.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2013: Storm track response to climate change: insights from simulations using an idealized dry GCM. DACA-13, 710, Davos, Switzerland.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2013: An investigation of storm track response to climate change using an idealized dry GCM. Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics Conference, 17.1, Rhode Island, USA.

Mbengue, C., and T. Schneider, 2012: Insights into midlatitude storm track dynamics from simulations with an idealized dry GCM. AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 1, 2, San Francisco, USA.

Theses

Mbengue, C., 2015: Storm track response to perturbations in climate. Ph.D. thesis, Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology.

Mbengue, C., 2008: The Caribbean court of justice: prospects and implications for the death penalty. M.Sc. thesis, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Oxford.

Mbengue, C., 2007: West Indian integration: necessary yet unconvincing (a rational choice application). M.Sc. thesis, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.

Miscellanea

Mbengue, C., 2005: Are the problems that the OECS faces related to poor public education and outreach? Internal Document, Organization of the Eastern Caribbean States.